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Best Tennis Balls

Updated December 2018
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers.
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.
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How we decided

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

  • 32 Models Considered
  • 7 Hours Researched
  • 1 Experts Interviewed
  • 195 Consumers Consulted
  • Zero products received from manufacturers.

    We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

    Why trust BestReviews?
    BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.
    BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers.
    BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.

    A tennis ball is a tennis ball, right? Wrong. There’s a wide range of makes for all sorts of different solutions. The main manufacturers are Penn, Wilson and Dunlop. They all make regular balls for indoor and clay courts and extra duty for hard court play. There are four speeds of tennis ball: slow, medium (most usual), fast, and high altitude (for about 4,000 ft.). There are also three types of felt – regular, extra duty, and grass court – and two ways of producing bounce, namely pressurized and pressureless. Pressurized balls are the most common. They come at 14 psi, although they lose their bounce after a few weeks of opening the can, at which point they become perfect for games of fetch with Fido. Pressureless tennis balls start out less bouncy and get livelier as the felt wears off, and work well with ball machines.

    The team that worked on this review
    • Enid
      Enid
      Editor
    • Jennifer
      Jennifer
      Writer
    • Melinda
      Melinda
      Web Producer

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