Best Ergonomic Mice

Updated April 2019
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.
We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.
Bottom Line
Pros
Cons
How we decided

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

25 Models Considered
6 Hours Researched
1 Experts Interviewed
131 Consumers Consulted
Zero products received from manufacturers.

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

Why trust BestReviews?
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.
We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.
We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.

Shopping guide for best ergonomic mice

Last Updated April 2019

If you’re at a computer all day long, it’s important to think about ergonomics — that is, you should make sure that the gear you use every day is suited for long-term use so you can avoid the pain and complications that come with repetitive motions. For most people, that means working with an ergonomic mouse and keyboard.

Standard mice often force our hands into awkward positions to use them, in most cases twisting the wrist. Over time, that can lead to problems like pain and even carpal tunnel syndrome. In contrast, ergonomic mice are built around a natural holding position that keeps the wrist in a more comfortable straight line. With an ergonomic mouse, long-term use and repetitive motions aren’t a problem.

Whether you’re new to ergonomic mice or you just need a new one, you’re in the right place. Here’s our best advice for finding your ideal ergonomic mouse. If you’re ready to buy, check out our top recommendations.

There is no industry or medical standard for the term “ergonomic,” which means that any manufacturer can call a mouse ergonomic, regardless of its impact on your hand positioning. Be sure you understand just what makes each one ergonomic — whether that’s how the buttons are positioned or how you’re supposed to hold it.

Key considerations

Before you start shopping, you can make the search easier by ruling out mice that don’t meet your needs. Here are a few questions to think about.

  • Will you be doing any gaming with your ergonomic mouse? If you’re a gamer, consider how responsive you want your controls to be — wireless mice can add lag time to your clicks, which can hold you back in games that require split-second reflexes. If you need a mouse connection that’s fail-proof, go with a wired ergonomic mouse.

  • Could you adapt to a trackball mouse? There’s no denying it: trackball mice are an acquired taste. Much like split keyboards, trackball mice are typically more ergonomic and have a small but devoted following among consumers. Trackball mice give you a plastic ball to roll around to move your mouse, which works with more natural movements than a traditional mouse. But there’s about a 50-50 chance that you’ll love it.

  • Are you left-handed? If you’re a southpaw, read carefully through the product listings for ergonomic mice. Some are reversible, so they can be used by both right-handed and left-handed people. If you don’t find a good universal ergonomic mouse, try searching for ergonomic mice made specifically for left-handed people.

EXPERT TIP

If you’ve got a Mac, double-check that the models you’re considering are compatible. Most ergonomic mice will work with your Mac for basic point-and-click functionality, but in some cases, extended functionality may not work.


Staff  | BestReviews

Features

There are all kinds of ergonomic mice, but a few models set themselves apart with some killer added functionality. Here are our favorite features to look out for.

  • Programmable buttons. This is a must-have feature: extra mouse buttons that you can assign to any keystroke you want. With programmable buttons, you can have one-touch access to specific key combinations. For example, you can set one button to copy, and another to paste, or you can set the extra buttons to control your computer’s volume. The sky’s the limit with programmable buttons, and the convenience is real; in other words, don’t buy an ergonomic mouse without them.

  • Adjustable PPI. Pixels-per-inch, often referred to as PPI, is how computer mice measure how precise they are. A mouse’s PPI gauges how many pixels the mouse will move on a screen when it’s physically moved one inch. High-PPI mice allow for precise control, which makes a difference for both gamers and digital artists. If you regularly use any application where pixel-perfect mouse placement matters, get an ergonomic mouse with adjustable PPI and manually set it to your needs.

  • Bluetooth connectivity. Most ergonomic mice come with USB dongles that allow them to wirelessly communicate with your computer. Although that’s the norm, it means using up an open USB port on your machine, which may be problematic if you’ve already got other things plugged in. To remedy this, some ergonomic mice have built-in Bluetooth, so they can use your computer’s existing Bluetooth connectivity instead of using up a USB port. If you don’t have any spare USB ports on your computer, but you still want to use an ergonomic mouse, find one with Bluetooth, and you’re good to go.

FOR YOUR SAFETY

If you’re experiencing any pain from your current mouse, talk to a doctor before buying a new mouse. In some cases, a different approach may be warranted; your doctor can help you make the best choice.

Ergonomic mice prices

It’s easy to find a quality ergonomic mouse for anywhere between $15 and $30. Whether you’re looking for a straightforward ergonomic mouse with lots of extra buttons or a trackball that will last forever, you don’t need to spend a ton. There are a lot of good models to be found for under $30.

If you’re buying an ergonomic mouse to address a problem with pain or based on your doctor’s recommendation, look at ergonomic mice that cost between $75 and $100. Ergonomic mice in this price range are made with high-quality materials and include premium features like high PPI settings.

Tips

  • If you’re planning on buying a new wireless keyboard in addition to your ergonomic mouse, consider buying a mouse-and-keyboard bundle. Wireless keyboards and mice are often packaged together and offered at a discount, but the real win is getting a set where both components rely on the same wireless USB adapter. Buying them separately could mean needing to use two different ports, which can be a tall order, especially on laptops.

  • If you’re trying a different type of mouse for the first time, give yourself a month to adjust. It can take a little while to get used to a new ergonomic mouse, especially if you’ve been using a different kind of mouse for quite a while. Give it a chance — developing new habits is hard, especially for muscle memory.

  • Find out what type of batteries your ergonomic mouse uses — then make sure to always keep extra on hand. Most ergonomic mice use AA or AAA batteries. Get in the habit of changing your batteries regularly, and keeping spares on hand, so you never get caught mouse-less in an important situation.

DID YOU KNOW?

Most ergonomic mice are quite light: around four ounces, with some models weighing up to eight ounces. That said, most ergonomic mice descriptions report the weight before batteries (and different models can use one, two, or three batteries).

Other products we considered

Logitech’s vertical wireless mouse is one our favorite ergonomic mice, because it’s both an effective tool for reducing wrist strain, and it’s also a fun conversation piece. The vertical design makes it look like a funky snail on its side, but the premium features steal the show — you can use it to control three different machines, it’s got 4,000 PPI tracking, and it’s got support for both wired and Bluetooth wireless connectivity. It’s on the pricier side, but the feature set definitely justifies the cost.
 

If you’re in the market for a wireless ergonomic mouse and keyboard bundle, we recommend Microsoft’s Sculpt Ergonomic Wireless Desktop Keyboard and Mouse set. It’s got a split keyboard with a built-in wrist rest, a separate number pad, and a wireless mouse, all in a matching glossy black finish. We love everything about this set: Microsoft’s ergonomic hardware offers a great compromise between aesthetics, wrist-friendly functionality, and a reasonable price tag.

Hands come in all shapes and sizes — and so do ergonomic mice. If you’ve got particularly small or particularly large hands, take that into account while you’re shopping.

FAQ

Q. Will a USB 2.0 ergonomic mouse be fast enough for everyday use? Is it better to buy a USB 3.0 model?
A. Either will be fine. While it’s true that USB 3.0 is a faster standard than USB 2.0, ergonomic mice don’t really need the extra speed from the newer standard. While the difference matters when it comes to large data transfers, you’ll never notice the difference with a mouse.
 

Q. If I get an ergonomic mouse, do I still need to use an ergonomic mouse pad or wrist rest?
A. It depends. A good ergonomic mouse will keep your wrist from twisting, but depending on how it’s designed, you may want to elevate your wrist anyway. Refer to recommendations in the instructions — but if your wrists or any part of your hand are sore after using it, that’s a potential sign you may need the extra help of a wrist rest. As with anything pain-related, you should consult with your doctor if a problem persists.
 

Q. How often should I expect to change the batteries on an ergonomic mouse?
A. Batteries in ergonomic mice last a long time — sometimes up to two months, depending on how frequently you use the mouse. While it’s never a bad idea to keep a spare set of batteries around, you can also take comfort knowing that with an ergonomic mouse, you won’t have to constantly be changing batteries.

The team that worked on this review
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