Best Women's Hybrid Golf Clubs

Updated December 2020
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and all opinions about the products are our own. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
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How we decided

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

30 Models Considered
8 Hours Researched
2 Experts Interviewed
145 Consumers Consulted
Zero products received from manufacturers.

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

Buying guide for Best women’s hybrid golf clubs

Hybrid golf clubs for women haven’t been around for very long, but they’ve quickly grown in popularity over the past several years. Hybrids combine the best of both irons and fairway woods. They’re easier to control and hit than long irons and deliver a better level of accuracy than a fairway wood.

Women’s hybrid golf clubs look a lot like men’s, featuring a lightweight design that delivers excellent clubhead speed. As with most women’s golf clubs, the hybrids have a shorter shaft than men’s hybrids. Because the hybrid clubs use a smaller clubhead than what’s found on a fairway wood, players can use them from tougher lies. If you hit the ball in the rough, you may not want to use a fairway wood, but a hybrid club is often a smart choice here.

If you’re interested in women’s hybrid golf clubs, we’ve put together this buying guide with some things you need to know as you shop. If you already know what you’re looking for, check out our favorites.

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For many women golfers, the ability to hit the ball successfully from a variety of lies and in a variety of settings with a hybrid club means it soon becomes one of the most trusted clubs in the bag.

Key considerations

Hybrid golf clubs for women come in quite a few design options. If you’re an experienced player, you probably want more features that help you control the shot. Beginners might be fine saving some money using a basic club because they don’t yet have the skills to shape the shot precisely.

Loft

Some golfers choose not to use a hybrid club because it simply duplicates what they already own. They’d rather stick with the 5-iron they have than use a 5-hybrid club.

Although it’s true that the loft angle on a typical hybrid clubface is similar to other clubs you may already own, some people have more success with the style of clubhead found on hybrids versus fairway woods or irons.

Hybrid clubs can be found in a range of loft angles from 15° to 28°, although hybrids outside that range do exist. Here are some of the common equivalents you’ll find for a hybrid club versus a more traditional iron or fairway wood, which means you can use the hybrid to replace the corresponding club in your bag.

2-Hybrid: 3- or 4-wood or 2-iron (about 15° loft)

3-Hybrid: 4- or 5-wood or 3-iron (about 18° loft)

4-Hybrid: 5- or 7-wood or 4-iron (about 21° loft)

5-Hybrid: 7- or 9-wood or 5-iron (about 24° loft)

6-Hybrid: 9- or 11-wood or 6-iron (about 28° loft)

Some hybrids are made to replace short irons in your bag, such as the 7-, 8-, or 9-iron, but these hybrids are not as common because most beginning golfers are able to hit these short irons successfully and don’t need to replace them with a hybrid club.

Center of gravity

On a hybrid club, the center of gravity is toward the back of the club and lower in the clubhead. This allows female golfers to more successfully pop the ball into the air, especially those golfers with a slower swing speed. Compared to a fairway wood, this adjustment to the center of gravity makes the hybrid club easier to hit well, especially for those women who don’t have a lot of experience playing the game.

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Did You Know?
If you’re purchasing a set of women’s golf clubs for a beginner, it likely contains at least one hybrid club.
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Features

Once you’ve found the type of loft you want in a hybrid club to add to your golf bag, you can then focus on the extra features that give you the capabilities you need to match your golf game and type of swing.

Clubhead

A stainless steel clubhead on a hybrid has some advantages for beginning golfers because it provides good durability and a desirable price point. Titanium is more expensive than stainless steel, but it is a lightweight material that allows the golfer to generate extra clubhead speed.

Clubhead sole: One reason why a hybrid club works so well from various lies is because it has a wide, flat sole that doesn’t easily dig into the turf. Whether you're on the fairway, rough, or fringe, the flat sole allows it to move effectively through grass of all heights and thickness.

Clubface

Certain materials found in the clubface, along with the design, can help players generate extra ball speed. Some clubfaces have a flat plate that allows for maximum rebound, passing that extra force to the ball.

Protect your hybrid club with a headcover to keep it from getting damaged while it’s in your golf bag.

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Women’s hybrid golf club prices

Hybrid clubs are slightly less expensive than fairway woods.

Inexpensive: The least expensive women’s hybrids cost $30 to $100. These clubs have basic designs aimed at high-handicap and beginner players.

Expensive: The most expensive women’s hybrid golf clubs cost $100 to $250. These clubs have technologies and designs that help the low-handicap golfer control the ball more effectively.

Sets: You also have the option of purchasing a couple or several hybrid clubs in a set. Expect to pay anywhere from $200 to $750 for a set.

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Did You Know?
According to the rules of golf, you may only carry 14 clubs. If you’re adding a hybrid club to your bag, you might need to remove a club. However, not all amateur players follow this 14-club limit.
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Tips

  • Expect the ball to roll. Compared to an average iron, the ball has less backspin off the hybrid clubface, meaning it will roll more after it hits the ground. Prepare for that when estimating your shot distance.
  • Consider using the hybrid club from the rough. A hybrid club can successfully move through certain types of vegetation, giving you a better chance of escaping a tough spot. Heavy, thick grass probably requires an iron, but a hybrid can handle less dense grass.
  • Use the hybrid club from the fringe. When you want to play a bump and run shot from the fringe of the green, a hybrid club is a smart choice. You’ll want to practice this shot at the putting green. Once you have the hang of it, it’s a strong tool to use for this shot.
  • Play the ball slightly forward. If you line up the ball in the center of your stance for an iron shot, you’ll want to play the ball a couple of inches ahead of center to match the swing path of the hybrid, which is more of a sweeping path than what you have with an iron.
  • Remember the reduced clubhead weight. You might get a little more distance with your hybrid when you first begin using it, especially if it’s quite a bit lighter than the long iron or fairway wood you’re replacing. You’re able to generate extra clubhead speed with the lighter hybrid.
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Some people refer to a hybrid club as a “rescue” club because you can use it from almost anywhere on the course, including particularly tough spots.

FAQ

Q. Do I have to use a hybrid club in place of my long irons?

A. No. Most golfers, especially mid- to high-handicap players, have far more success with hybrids than with long irons. However, if you like the way you perform with your long irons, there’s no rule that says you need to switch to hybrids.

Q. I am a low-handicap player. Do I really need a hybrid club?

A. The hybrid club has so many potential uses that even low-handicap players can successfully use this club. You aren’t required to use one, but it’s worth spending some time using it on the practice range to see if you can take advantage of its versatility on the course.

Q. Do I have to use a women’s hybrid club or can I purchase a men’s version?

A. The primary difference between women’s and men’s hybrid clubs is the shaft length. If you are taller than average, you might be able to use a men’s hybrid club successfully. The women’s hybrid club often weighs less than the men’s version, too, allowing the female player to have an easier time generating clubhead speed.

Q. Is it okay to carry more than one hybrid club?

A. Sure. Some women discover that they have so much more success with a hybrid club that they swap out quite a few of their other clubs for hybrids. If you struggle to hit the ball straight off the tee with a driver, for example, you might want a hybrid club with a minimal loft angle to use off the tee. You’ll sacrifice a bit of distance compared to the driver, but you should be able to hit the hybrid straighter.

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