Best Snowboard Bindings

Updated July 2020
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
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Why trust BestReviews?
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
How we decided

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

28 Models Considered
7 Hours Researched
1 Experts Interviewed
345 Consumers Consulted
Zero products received from manufacturers.

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

Buying guide for best snowboard bindings

Last Updated July 2020

Snowboarding can be a fun winter exercise, serving as a nice alternative to skiing. And while some people find skiing easier to learn for beginners, snowboarders are loyal to their sport. Once you get the hang of snowboarding, you may never go back to skiing.

As snowboarders gain experience, they often learn how to do multiple tricks and jumps, which makes it an appealing sport, especially for younger people. Because of this acrobatic aspect of snowboarding, the gear used tends to be more comfortable than ski equipment — especially the boots and bindings. Whereas walking in ski boots can be an uncomfortable experience, snowboarding boots are flexible, soft, and comfortable for walking. Similarly, snowboard bindings are more comfortable and flexible than ski bindings.

When it comes to choosing the right set of snowboard bindings, there are many factors to weigh. What boarding style do you favor? How are the binding sizes measured? Which features are best suited to your needs? It’s a lot to take in, but our snowboard bindings buying guide will have you strapped into a proper set in no time.

If you’re renting a snowboard, you can still bring your own boots and bindings. The rental shop can help you find a compatible board.

Key considerations

When searching for the best snowboard bindings, think about how you plan to ride your snowboard. Various bindings types are designed to work best with certain riding styles.

  • Freestyle: A freestyle rider, also called a park rider, wants maximum flexibility in the bindings. With the greater ability to flex the ankles and feet, these riders are able to perform multiple tricks, including grabbing the board. Landings after jumps are softer when using a flexible type of binder, too.
  • Mountain: Mountain riders like to snowboard in a variety of locations and conditions. They may encounter powdered snow, icy trails, or something in between. They’ll ride on groomed ski runs or may perform some freestyle tricks in a park setting. This type of rider generally prefers bindings that deliver a mix of flexibility and rigidity.
  • Freeride: Freeride snowboarders will be riding on the most challenging terrain. They can find themselves in deep snow on steep runs that likely will not have been groomed. With this style of riding, a stiffer type of binding is preferred. With stiffness in the binding, more of the rider’s energy is transferred to the board, allowing for maximum speed and control.
     

When comparing bindings, some manufacturers will give their bindings a flexibility number rating. On a scale from 1 to 10, lower numbers denote softer and more flexible bindings, while higher numbers are progressively stiffer.

Additionally, you want to match the style of boot you’re wearing to the snowboard bindings you’re using. A boot with a lot of flex should be paired with bindings that have quite a bit of flex, for example.

EXPERT TIP

If you’ve never tried snowboarding before, renting your gear the first few times is a smart idea. You’ll be able to gain a feel for the gear you like before buying your own.


Staff  | BestReviews

Features

Snowboard bindings basics

Snowboard bindings have a variety of parts that are important to understand, so you can find the best model for your style of riding.

Mounting screws: A snowboard will have multiple holes in it, so the rider can adjust the position of the bindings. The rider can pick how far apart his or her feet will be, as well as where they’re positioned on the board. One model of binding may require three mounting screws, while another model may use four mounting screws.

Mounting disc: The disc is at the bottom of the binding. It is the part that actually attaches to the snowboard with the mounting screws. The rider can adjust the angle of the disc to allow for slight adjustments in the way the bindings fit.

Padding: A snowboard binding will have padding in the back and along the base plate, which serves as the sole to the entire binding. Proper padding absorbs vibration as you’re riding over rough trails.

Straps and buckles: Snowboard bindings will have ankle and toe straps. These fit over the top of the toe box and over the top of the ankle area. An ankle strap keeps the heel of the foot in place when the rider is leaning onto their toes. The toe strap keeps the front of the foot in place when the rider leans back on their heels. Buckles included in these straps allow you to adjust the tightness of the straps.

Highback: The highback is the back section of the binding, supporting the back of the leg and foot. It extends upward from the heel of the binding. When leaning backward on the binding, the highback helps the rider maintain balance by supporting the lower leg.

Binding types

Multiple types of binding designs are available, allowing you to match the binding to your riding style. There are three main types.

Strap-in bindings: The majority of bindings use a strap-in design, although other binding styles are becoming popular. Simply loosen the straps to slide your foot into the binding, and then tighten the straps to begin using the snowboard. Easy peasy.

Rear-entry bindings: With a rear-entry binding, the highback portion of the binding will fold backward, making it easier to slide your foot in. You’ll then return the highback to a vertical position, tighten the straps, and start riding.

Step-on bindings: A step-on binding allows riders to put the bindings on quickly. Just slide the boot into the bindings, and the heel locks in place. However, only a limited number of boots and bindings support this design.

Sizes

Within the various models of bindings, you may have the option to select among five different size bracket. (Some models are limited to two or three sizes.) Bindings will usually fit a few ranges of snowboard boot sizes, but check the manufacturer’s sizing chart to determine your best fit.

EXPERT TIP

Those experiencing foot pain or numbness while snowboarding may be wearing the wrong boots or socks. Don’t automatically assume this problem is related to the bindings.


Staff  | BestReviews

Snowboard bindings prices

Basic snowboard bindings

As with other types of snowboarding gear, bindings are pricey. For beginners, bindings will cost $50 to $125. These are simple bindings that are made to handle minimal stress during basic riding.

Mid-level bindings

If you’re looking to perform tricks and challenging jumps, you’ll need a higher quality of binding that has flexibility and a maximum level of padding. These bindings will cost $125 to $250. Bindings in this price range will generally have some waterproof features, preventing the buildup of snow and ice on them as you ride.

Bindings for advanced snowboarders

For advanced boarders, you’ll want the maximum quality in snowboard bindings. These bindings should give you comfort and flex, allowing for especially tough tricks. But you also will want lightweight materials in the bindings, typically more carbon fiber than fiberglass. Bindings in this price range have outstanding waterproof capabilities and cost anywhere from  $250 to $600.

The size of the bindings you select should not affect the price much. Small, medium, and large bindings from the same manufacturer usually carry the same price tag.

EXPERT TIP

Snowboard bindings with a bit of flex to them can help you have better success standing up after a fall.


Staff  | BestReviews

Tips

  • Find the right snowboard size. Just like snowboard bindings need to match the size of your boots, the snowboard you pick should match your body size. People who are shorter and weigh less need shorter snowboards than people who are taller and heavier. Snowboard makers offer sizing guides that can help you pick the right board.
  • Find the right snowboard boots. A snowboard boot should fit your foot snugly, but it should not be so tight that it hurts. Your feet will naturally swell a little bit as you snowboard, so you want a tiny bit of wiggle room in the boot.
  • Match your helmet and goggles. Some goggles require a certain type of snowboarding helmet for a proper fit. It may benefit you to purchase the helmet and goggles at the same time.
  • Cut down on the wind chill. If you’ll be snowboarding for quite a few hours, you will want to avoid skin exposing your skin to the wind. Hands and necks often are exposed to the wind when snowboarding, so mittens and a balaclava can protect you skin nicely. You’ll find that your helmet will keep your head warm enough that you won’t need a hat.

Other products we considered

The System LTX Rear Entry Snowboard Bindings feature the latest design from System. These bindings have a good price point with plenty of padding for comfort.

For an even lower-priced set of bindings, consider the Flow Alpha Snowboard Bindings. This set has locking ratchets to allow for quick adjustments.

We also like the Union Binding Company Flite Pro Snowboard Bindings, which are available in multiple colors. They feature materials designed to work in almost any temperature, helping them absorb shock nicely.

Snowboard bindings differ from ski bindings in that they will not release the foot if you crash, so the board stays attached to your legs.

FAQ

Q. How do I know if I have snowboard bindings that fit?
A.
If the binding fits, your foot should have a little bit of flex as you ride. The heel area should fit tightly in the binding. The boots should not hang over the bindings by a large amount. But it’s also important to have comfortable boots that fit properly to achieve the best fit and maximum comfort in the bindings.
 

Q. As a female snowboarder, do I have to wear women’s bindings?
A.
Not necessarily. However, snowboard bindings made for women will often have specific design features to match snowboard boots made for women. Pairing women’s boots with women’s bindings generally creates a more comfortable fit for women. But you can use any bindings you desire.
 

Q. Are there bindings that fit without requiring me to sit in the snow and strap in before hitting a trail?
A.
Some manufacturers do offer boots that work with certain bindings to allow the snowboarder to just step into the bindings without having to sit down. This is a handy feature, but you do have to be sure both your boots and your bindings support this design.
 

Q. Should I take off the snowboard bindings at any time?
A.
Snowboard bindings are made to be removed as needed. The snowboarder can remove and attach the binding to the board without the need of a repair shop. Snowboarders can loosen or remove the bindings when placing the board in storage. By comparison, ski bindings are installed at the time of purchase and are rarely removed.

The team that worked on this review
  • Ciera
    Ciera
    Digital Content Producer
  • Kyle
    Kyle
    Writer
  • Melinda
    Melinda
    Web Producer

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