Best Field Hockey Sticks

Updated July 2020
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
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Why trust BestReviews?
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
How we decided

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

24 Models Considered
7 Hours Researched
1 Experts Interviewed
380 Consumers Consulted
Zero products received from manufacturers.

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

Buying guide for best field hockey sticks

Last Updated July 2020

Being a successful field hockey player requires mastering all the basic skills like dribbling, hitting, scooping, and tackling. But you also need the right gear, and no piece of equipment is as essential as the right field hockey stick. It can maximize your skills, so you’re able to execute perfectly every time you play the game.

A field hockey stick has a J-like shape with a long straight handle and a bow that connects the stick to a head with a curved toe. Traditionally, the sticks were made of wood, but now many models are made of composites like fiberglass or carbon fiber, which increases their flexibility. That flexibility can provide greater control as you move the ball across the field, but sticks that are more rigid offer increased power when you strike the ball.

Because there are so many options to choose from, finding the right field hockey stick can be a challenge. With the helpful tips in our buying guide, you’ll be able to find the best one for your next game. If you’re still unsure, we’ve also included some product recommendations to help make shopping as easy as can be.

Many field hockey stick manufacturers offer a warranty for their products, so if damage occurs that’s beyond normal wear and tear, your stick may be protected.

Key considerations

Skill level

Field hockey sticks are available for four different skill levels, so you’re sure to choose an option that maximizes your abilities.

Beginner: These sticks are the best choice for players who are just learning the game and need to develop their control and basic skills. Field hockey players who are 10 years old or younger and have been playing for less than a year should opt for a beginner stick.

Intermediate: These sticks help players focus on their control while allowing them to bring more power to their game. Field hockey players who are 10 to 13 years old and have been playing for one to two years should opt for an intermediate stick.

Expert or advanced: These sticks allow players to perfect both their power and control and continue developing as a skilled athlete on the field. Players who are 13 years old and above and have been playing for more than two years should choose an expert stick.

Elite: These sticks allow you to play with power and precision and are meant for highly skilled players. Players who are 15 years old and above and have been playing for three years or more should go with an elite stick.

Material

Field hockey sticks are made from a few different materials, but most models feature a combination of materials.

Wood: Wood, usually mulberry or hickory, is the most traditional material for field hockey sticks. But these days it’s mainly used for beginner sticks because it offers a lightweight feel and plenty of flexibility, so you can receive the ball cleanly even if you aren’t a very skilled player. Wooden sticks are usually more affordable, too, though many modern versions include fiberglass to add power and durability.

Carbon: This material gives a field hockey stick greater stiffness, so it strikes the ball with more force and power. The more carbon a stick contains, the more rigid it is. Some sticks contain as little as 10% carbon, while others are made entirely of carbon. Because they don’t bend like other materials, carbon field hockey sticks require more skill to handle, so they’re best used by expert or elite players.

Fiberglass: This material is used to reinforce composite field hockey sticks to improve their durability. It can also help increase a stick’s power, but it still has a nice lightweight feel and isn’t as stiff as carbon. New players can benefit from a stick that’s reinforced with fiberglass, while advanced players get power from a stick made entirely of fiberglass.

Aramid: This strong, lightweight material is added to many composite field hockey sticks because it helps absorb any vibration that occurs when you hit or receive the ball.

Length

Getting a field hockey stick of the right length is crucial if you’re going to be effective on the field. The best length usually depends on your height. The stick should reach from the ground to the top of the hip bone, but midfielders and defensive players sometimes like a longer stick that provides more power for driving the ball. Many offensive players go for shorter sticks, which give them better control. Here are some general guidelines for stick length and player height:

28” stick: Best for players 4’ and under
30” stick: Best for players 4’1” to 4’3”
32” stick: Best for players 4’4” to 4’6”
34” stick: Best for players 4’7” to 5’
35” to 35.5” stick: Best for players 5’1” to 5’3”
36” to 36.5” stick: Best for players 5’4” to 5’9”
37” to 37.5” stick: Best for players 5’10” and over

Weight

The best weight for a field hockey stick depends on the position you play.

Heavy: Halfbacks and fullbacks typically prefer heavier sticks that weigh 22 to 24 ounces to help drive the ball farther.

Average: Midfielders should opt for sticks that weigh approximately 21 ounces to allow for both offensive and defensive plays.

Light: Forwards benefit from lighter sticks that weigh less than 21 ounces.

EXPERT TIP

If you feel uncomfortable vibrations through your field hockey stick, wrapping it with ceramic tape can help reduce the sensation.


Staff  | BestReviews

Features

Toe design

The toe is the bottom portion of a field hockey stick head. It curves upward and is used to strike the ball. You can choose from a variety of toe designs, but you should use your position as a guide to picking the best option.

Shorti: This toe shape is the most widely used option for offensive players. That’s because it allows you to turn the stick over the ball quickly while still providing control and balance.

Midi: This toe shape is ideal for new field hockey players and midfielders. It’s approximately 1/2 inch longer than shorti toes, so the hitting surface is larger, but you can still easily flick, receive, and reverse play.

Maxi: This toe shape is usually the preferred option for defensive players. It has a larger receiving area, but it can still strike the ball as powerfully as a midi toe. Maxi toes give the stick a bigger stopping area to receive and defend, too.

Hook: This toe shape has a sharper J-shape than the other toes. The head is made of two pieces that give it a larger surface area, which gives the player greater control.

Bow design

The bow is the portion of the field hockey stick that curves or bends away from the handle to the toe. Based on your skill level and preference, you can choose from three different bow designs.

Regular: This bow measures between 0.8 and 0.88 inch (20 and 22 millimeters) and positions the most curved section right in the middle of the stick. You’ll have excellent power and control with it, so it works well for beginner and intermediate players.

Control: This bow measures between 0.88 and 0.92 inch (22 and 23 mm) and places the sharpest portion of the curve nearer the toe. That gives the stick some extra power when you’re lifting and drag flicking the ball. It works best for advanced players.

Late: This bow measures between 0.96 and 1.0 inch (24 and 25 mm) and positions the curve at the farthest end of the stick, just before the head. That gives it better control when lifting the ball, drag flicking, and performing aerials. It’s ideally suited for elite players.

Color/pattern

While you want to get all the technical aspects of a field hockey stick just right, you also want it to look good. Fortunately, you can find sticks in a wide variety of colors and patterns. You may want to match your stick to your uniform or just choose a model with your favorite colors.

EXPERT TIP

When you’re playing offense in field hockey, a shorter stick allows you to work on your stick-handling skills more effectively.


Staff  | BestReviews

Field hockey stick prices

Field hockey sticks vary in price based on their materials and skill level. Most models range from $25 to $400.

Inexpensive: Beginner field hockey sticks are typically the most affordable. Wooden models are the least expensive, though you can find some composite models that aren’t too costly. You’ll usually pay between $25 and $60 for a beginner stick.

Mid-range: These options usually include intermediate field hockey sticks. They’re typically made of carbon, fiberglass, or composite materials and generally range from $60 to $130.

Expensive: The priciest field hockey sticks are advanced and elite models. They’re often made of carbon, fiberglass, or composite materials and typically cost between $130 and $400.

EXPERT TIP

You’ll pay more for a field hockey stick with a higher carbon content, but advanced and elite players usually prefer the power that these sticks provide.


Staff  | BestReviews

Tips

  • Clean your field hockey stick. To help your field hockey stick last as long as possible, always clean it well after each game or practice. Be sure to wipe away any dirt, mud, or moisture before putting it away.
  • Avoid pavement. Only play with your field hockey stick on grass or turf surfaces. Avoid concrete, rocky, or paved surfaces, which can damage the stick.
  • Tape your stick. It’s a good idea to tape the bottom 4 inches of your field hockey stick’s shaft to provide some protection against the impact of other players’ sticks.
When you’re playing defense in field hockey, a longer stick gives you a greater reach and allows you to drive the ball farther.

FAQ

Q. Do I need a special field hockey stick if I’m left-handed?
A.
There aren’t any left-handed hockey sticks for field hockey. A stick’s head features a flat side and a rounded side, but you’re only allowed to strike the ball with the flat side, which means even left-handed players must use a right-handed stick.
 

Q. Can I fix scratches or chips in a field hockey stick?
A.
Depending on the depth of the scratch or chip, you might be able to repair your stick with some epoxy resin glue. It works well for deep scratches, but deeper chips may be more difficult to fill in.
 

Q. Do I need a special stick for indoor field hockey?
A.
Indoor field hockey does require a different stick than outdoor field hockey. While the materials and overall shape are the same, indoor sticks are usually thinner and significantly lighter in weight. That’s because they don’t require the same power that outdoor sticks do since the indoor fields are much smaller.

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