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Updated September 2020
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and all opinions about the products are our own. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and all opinions about the products are our own. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
Bottom line
Pros
Cons
Best of the Best
Baffin Base Camp Slipper
Baffin
Base Camp Slipper
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Best for Fireside Comfort
Bottom Line

Built with a cushioned sole and reinforced seams, this bootie is perfect for schlepping around camp after a tough day’s hike.

Pros

While camp booties are primarily meant to keep feet warm in a tent or hammock, the reinforced sole will hold up to quick walks around the campsite. Sized to accommodate feet of nearly all sizes. Toasty warm, with drawstrings that keep drafts out.

Cons

Sizing tends to run large, and improperly fit booties can impede comfort and warmth.

Best Bang for the Buck
HotHands Insole Foot Warmer
HotHands
Insole Foot Warmer
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Longest Lasting Heat
Bottom Line

Single-use warmers that last up to 9 hours and stay in place inside your footwear.

Pros

Heat is air activated and takes between 15-30 minutes to heat up. Adhesive on bottom gives them grip to stay in place in most shoes, including: ski boots, hiking boots, and tennis shoes. TSA-approved for air travel.

Cons

Is one-size-fits-most and won’t give larger feet as much coverage.

Autocastle Rechargeable Electric Heated Socks
Autocastle
Rechargeable Electric Heated Socks
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Best All-day Warmth
Bottom Line

Great for a long day spent skiing or tromping around in cold, snowy or muddy conditions, but you will likely have cold toes.

Pros

These knee-high socks provide up to 6 hours of consistent heat. Top of sock, and its battery compartment pocket, reach higher than the top of most ski and mountain boots. Three heat settings help manage power output and comfort. Socks are thick and comfortable.

Cons

Warming coils only reach the tops of the feet, leaving toes cold.

Wind Hard Winter Down Booties
Wind Hard
Winter Down Booties
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Toastiest Sleepwear
Bottom Line

Toasty warm on cold nights, these keep feet comfortable inside the sleeping bag.

Pros

Sized accurately for a range of foot sizes, these camp booties fit very comfortably. They stay toasty even in below-freezing temperatures. Ultralight and highly compressible, so they crush down small or roll up easily inside a sleeping bag.

Cons

No soles, so they can only be used inside the tent and sleeping bag.

21Century Solutions 1.5mm Neoprene Toe Warmers
21Century Solutions
1.5mm Neoprene Toe Warmers
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Good for Chilly Toes
Bottom Line

These chemical-free warmers are more environmentally friendly, but they also don’t keep feet as warm as other options.

Pros

Provide an extra layer of insulation around the toes and the ball of the foot, keeping them warm and comfortable. The neoprene fabric is thin enough to be unobtrusive.

Cons

The fabric doesn’t wick away moisture, so toes eventually get cold as the user’s socks get damp.

HOW WE TESTED

We recommend these products based on an intensive research process that's designed to cut through the noise and find the top products in this space. Guided by experts, we spend hours looking into the factors that matter, to bring you these selections.

38
Models
Considered
115
Consumers
Consulted
18
Hours
Researched
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Almost every camper has suffered the discomfort of chilly feet, even during the warmer months of the year. Wet footwear, poorly insulated sleeping bags, and reduced circulation are common causes of cold feet. To stay comfortable in icy weather and to stay toasty warm inside the tent, hikers and campers can use an array of products designed to keep the feet warm. Air-activated warmers, which use chemicals that heat up when unwrapped, are a popular option due to their compact size, but some worry about their environmental impact and cost over time (most are disposable after one use). Other options include socks with electric heating elements, which are helpful in freezing conditions, and soft camp booties filled with down or synthetic filling that keep feet warm – as long as the booties stay dry.

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