Best Anti-Fog Ski Goggles

Updated April 2019
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.
We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.
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How we decided

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

17 Models Considered
6 Hours Researched
1 Experts Interviewed
182 Consumers Consulted
Zero products received from manufacturers.

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

Why trust BestReviews?
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.
We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.
We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.

Shopping guide for best anti-fog ski goggles

Last Updated April 2019

Anti-fog ski goggles ensure that you can see clearly when you ski thanks to a coating on the inside of the lens that prevents moisture buildup. The goggles come in a variety of shapes and styles and have lenses that offer different levels of protection from sunlight.

Cylindrical lenses are popular for their lower price and straightforward design, while spherical lenses generally offer a wider field of view and less distortion. Polarization and UV protection can protect your eyes from sunlight and reflected light.

You should consider your head shape, helmet style, and whether you will wear glasses when you are shopping for a new pair of anti-fog ski goggles.

How does fogging occur?

When moisture from your skin and breath come into contact with a cold lens, the lens will fog if it’s not treated with anti-fog coating. Proper airflow and a decent amount of space between your skin and the lens can also decrease the likelihood of moisture collecting on the lens. If your ski mask or neckwarmer is tucked under your goggles, your breath will travel directly into your lens, causing your breath to fog up the lens.

Anti-fog goggles are as much about safety as they are about comfort. A good pair of anti-fog goggles can keep you safe while you ski.

Considerations

Anti-fog coating

The coating that prevents moisture from accumulating is hydrophobic. This means that it reduces surface tension, making it difficult for water to cling to the lens. It is also possible to spray an anti-fog solution on regular ski goggles, but many people find anti-fog ski goggles to be more effective.

Durability and comfort

The most delicate (and important) part of a pair of ski goggles is the lens, which can become scratched on the slope or in a gear bag. Lenses are typically made from polycarbonate, and they may have an anti-scratch coating on the outside of the lens.

The frame is usually made of a plastic like polyurethane, which is flexible and difficult to break. This allows the frame to fit to your helmet and face, to an extent.

Finding the right pair of ski goggles for you means looking for goggles appropriate for your head size and helmet. Another major factor in comfort level is the foam padding that rests against your face. With mid-range and higher-end goggles, the foam will have several layers of varying softnesses and density.

Cylindrical lenses vs. spherical lenses

Less-expensive anti-fog ski goggles may have cylindrical or “flat” lenses that curve in one direction. These lenses are more susceptible to glare and may be positioned closer to the face, resulting in more fog. In addition, they often have a smaller field of view and may have some distortion.

Spherical lenses are found in moderately priced to expensive lenses and tend to provide better peripheral vision, less glare, and less distortion. The round shape of the lens typically means it is farther from your face and therefore less likely to fog up.

Ventilation

When you think of skiing in frigid temperatures, ventilation may not be the first thing on your mind. However, ventilation is another key factor that helps prevent foggy lenses.

Most goggles have some ventilation along the top of the frame. Some may have additional ventilation at the top of the lenses or on the sides of the frame. The priciest ski goggles may even have ventilation fans.

Visible light transmission (VLT)

The VLT percentage of a pair of ski goggles indicates how much light is allowed to pass through the lens. A lower percentage means that less light is able to permeate the lens. Therefore, lenses with low VLT percentages are best for sunny days, while lenses with high VLT percentages (sometimes approaching 100%) are better for dusk or night skiing.

Over-the-glasses (OTG) designs

Not all anti-fog ski goggles are designed to fit comfortably over a pair of regular eyeglasses. Many products are specifically designated as OTG goggles, but it’s a good idea to read customer reviews to get an idea of how comfortably the goggles fit over glasses. Bear in mind that your glasses may fog up while your goggles remain free of moisture.

DID YOU KNOW?

Wearing makeup or sunscreen puts you at risk of damaging the anti-fog layer of the inner lens.

DID YOU KNOW?

Some companies offer prescription anti-fog lenses so you don’t need to worry about OTG designs or having your glasses fog up on the slope.

Features

Once you know what type of anti-fog goggles you are looking for, consider these additional features to improve your experience on the slopes.

Lens color

Your lens color should suit the conditions and brightness on the mountain.

  • A dark brown or gray lens is the best choice for a bright or sunny day.

  • Rose or reddish lenses work well in all conditions, so you won’t need to worry about swapping out lenses or goggles depending on the weather or time of day.

  • Yellow lenses are the best option for low-light conditions, as they can bring out contrast and make it easier to see obstacles and snow patterns. Clear lenses also work well for night skiing.

Polarized, mirrored, UV-protecting, and photochromic lenses

For the best protection from sunlight and reflected light, consider going beyond a simple tinted lens.

  • Polarized lenses reduce glare from the sun and snow, though they may also reduce visibility.

  • Mirrored lenses reduce glare and can block light in the brightest conditions.

  • UV-protecting lenses prevent UV light from entering and damaging your eyes. Almost all tinted goggles offer UV protection.

  • Photochromic lenses tend to be more expensive, as they adjust their tint depending on the light level.
     

Dual-pane designs

If you want the best anti-fog protection, be sure to avoid single-pane lens designs. Dual pane lenses create a pocket between the two lenses that keeps the inner lens warmer, reducing the chance of fog and condensation buildup.

Ease of changing lenses and additional lenses

If any part of your anti-fog goggles needs replacing, it will likely be the lens. Look for anti-fog ski goggles with easily removable and replaceable lenses. Some goggles may even include additional lenses for repairs or for skiing in different conditions.

Cases

Some anti-fog ski goggles include a protective case that helps the frame maintain its shape and keeps the lens from scratching while in your bag. A hard case is your best bet. If the goggles you select don’t include a case or bag, you may want to consider purchasing one separately.

EXPERT TIP

If your anti-fog goggles do fog up, remove them and let them air out rather than wiping the inner lens with a cloth, as this could destroy the anti-fog layer.


Staff  | BestReviews

Anti-fog ski goggle prices

For $15 to $50, you can find an entry-level pair of anti-fog ski goggles that will probably have a cylindrical lens, often single-pane. These are a good option for beginners or children, but they may not be the most comfortable.

Goggles from $50 to $100 offer better UV protection and may be more flexible and durable. Some goggles in this range may include a case or bag. Lenses are generally dual-pane and spherical.

For $100 to $250, you can get a quality pair of anti-fog ski goggles that will last you for years if cared for well. Additional accessories like extra lenses and a carrying case are common.

CAUTION

Glass cleaner will remove the anti-fog coating of lenses and should never be used as a cleanings solution for your ski goggles.

Tips

  • When removing your goggles, avoid keeping them on your forehead, as they are likely to fog up quickly.

  • Replace lenses carefully, avoiding contact with the inner lens in particular to prevent smudges and damage to the anti-fog coating.

  • Try your new goggles on with your helmet before you climb on the lift to make sure the goggles fit comfortably.

  • Avoid storing your goggles on your helmet, as they will be susceptible not only to scratches but also to warping of the frame and wearing out of the elastic in the strap.

Other products we considered

There are a range of anti-fog ski goggles available aside from our top picks. Two models in particular stand out for their spherical designs and yellow-tinted lenses. The Zionor X Ski Goggles have a unisex design and an easily detachable dual-layer lens. Though they’re on the bulkier side, this allows for a wide perspective that customers love. We like that these are an OTG design with plenty of ventilation. For a flashier option, the Fuel Optics High Performance Anti-Fog Ski Goggles are praised for their magnetic removable lens and reliable anti-fog design. The lens is delicate, but it provides a clear view with little glare.

Above all else, your anti-fog ski goggles should be comfortable and fit your head, face, and helmet well. The conditions and time of day in which you ski should play a role in which goggles you select, as some lenses are better for night skiing or sunny days than others.

FAQ

Q. How do I clean my anti-fog goggles?

A. The outside lens can be cleaned with a goggle cloth using a gentle wiping motion to avoid damaging the coating or mirroring. The inside lens should never be cleaned, if possible, as the anti-fog coating is easy to damage.

Q. Why are my anti-fog goggles still fogging up?

A. The most common cause is clogged vents. Make sure your vents are clean, and clear of any debris so you can maintain airflow in your goggles.

Q. How effective are anti-fog sprays?

A. Anti-fog sprays can work well and are not very expensive. However, most well-made ski goggles will have an anti-fog coating. If your goggles do not, you may be better off upgrading to a new pair of goggles.

The team that worked on this review
  • Devangana
    Devangana
    Web Producer
  • Eliza
    Eliza
    Production Manager
  • Melinda
    Melinda
    Web Producer
  • Melissa
    Melissa
    Senior Editor
  • Peter
    Peter
    Writer

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