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Updated October 2021
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and all opinions about the products are our own. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and all opinions about the products are our own. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
Bottom line
Pros
Cons
Best of the Best
Estwing Shingle Hammer
Estwing
Shingle Hammer
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Bottom Line

Plenty of heft in a shingle hammer that makes it easy to drive nails and trim shingles.

Pros

Has a one-piece construction that ensures it will last a long time. Handle cover is comfortable to hold, and it reduces vibration in the hand, too. Gives you a retractable blade for between 4 and 5.625 inches of exposure. Level of build quality is perfect for the professional in this "Made in America" product. Good price for a big hammer.

Cons

Weighs 28 ounces, so it gives plenty of power, but it also may wear you out.

Best Bang for the Buck
Stanley Shingle Hammer
Stanley
Shingle Hammer
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Bottom Line

Very low price for a shingle hammer that has a high level of construction quality.

Pros

Includes a notch in the blade to pull old nails. Features a one-piece forged steel construction that will deliver a nice level of performance for quick repair jobs, especially considering its low price point. Hammer has a rubber handle so you can maintain a sure grip on the hammer, even in hot conditions.

Cons

May not stand up well to constant usage. Only weighs 13 ounces.

Stanley FatMax Shingle Hammer
Stanley
FatMax Shingle Hammer
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Bottom Line

Excellent build quality in a shingle hammer that also gives you a comfortable weight of 15 ounces.

Pros

Uses a design similar to a tuning fork and a cushioned handle to reduce problems with vibrations. One-piece forged steel ensures this hammer will last a long time. At 15 ounces in weight, you won't tire as quickly while using this shingle hammer. Blade end includes a nail notch to pull old nails.

Cons

Some people will want more weight and a larger size in a shingle hammer.

AJC 17 oz. Magnet Roofing Hatchet
AJC
17 oz. Magnet Roofing Hatchet
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Bottom Line

Provides a high level of craftsmanship in a hammer with a wooden handle, but it's pricey.

Pros

Head of the shingle hammer includes a notch so you can quickly pull old nails. Gives you 17 ounces of weight, so it shouldn't wear you down too quickly. Includes a sliding gauge to help you finish the job more efficiently. Allows you to work fast, especially when hammering felt by hand. Wooden handle is of a good quality.

Cons

Expensive. Doesn't have the weight some may want in a shingle hammer for driving nails.

AJC Roofing Hatchet
AJC
Roofing Hatchet
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Bottom Line

Nice price point for a big shingle hammer that will help you drive nails efficiently.

Pros

At 19 ounces in weight, this is a really nice sized hammer for driving nails quickly. Blade has a notch to help you pull old nails in a hurry. Uses an adjustable gauge between 4 and 5.625 inches to ensure you can do the job just right every time. Carbon steel blade should give you a nice performance level.

Cons

High-quality hickory handle, but it may become slick in hot and sweaty conditions.

HOW WE TESTED

We recommend these products based on an intensive research process that's designed to cut through the noise and find the top products in this space. Guided by experts, we spend hours looking into the factors that matter, to bring you these selections.

56
Models
Considered
60
Consumers
Consulted
10
Hours
Researched
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Shingle hammers need to be more versatile than their regular counterparts since the job of roofing is complex and dangerous. Having to bring multiple tools up can be an inconvenience at best. As a result, most shingle hammers are designed to do more than the job of hammering nails into things. However, the flat surface of most hammers does have the weight needed to drive nails through shingles and other roofing materials into the framework below. The opposite end tends to be focused on cutting materials like shingle excess so construction workers don't have to reach for a separate tool to get the job done.

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