Best Window Squeegees

Updated December 2019
Why trust BestReviews?
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
Bottom Line
Pros
Cons
Why trust BestReviews?
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
How we decided

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

27 Models Considered
6 Hours Researched
1 Experts Interviewed
258 Consumers Consulted
Zero products received from manufacturers.

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

Buying guide for best window squeegees

Last Updated December 2019

Windows get all the dirt, and not in a good way. Unlike many household surfaces, windows collect debris on the inside and the outside, displaying it for all to see. Many “miracle” glass cleaners claim to be the best at cutting through the dirt, but none live up to the standard set by the squeegee.

Window squeegees are glass-cleaning tools that feature a smooth, flat blade made of rubber. Squeegees are extremely effective because they push the dirt off the surface of the window, unlike so-called “miracle” cleaners. Before using the squeegee, a liquid cleanser is used to break up the dirt on the window and lubricate the surface. The squeegee is then able to remove both the water and dirt from the glass.

Window squeegees come in a number of sizes and lengths to tackle just about any job. What size and which features are best for you? Keep reading to learn more. When you’re ready to buy, check out our recommendations for the best window squeegees on the market. 

Having trouble getting your glass shower door as clean as you’d like? Try a window squeegee!

Key considerations

Blade

Most squeegees come with a rubber blade that traps and pushes water and dirt off the window, leaving behind a clean surface.

Soft rubber: Most squeegee blades are made of soft rubber, and this works well in many climates. However, in temperatures 90°F and above, soft rubber may start to lose its effectiveness. High heat can soften soft rubber blades to the point that they’re excessively pliable, and very soft blades leave streaks on the glass. You can assume rubber blades are soft rubber unless they’re specifically marked “hard.”

Hard rubber: Squeegees with hard rubber blades are more difficult to find. Hard rubber is still flexible, but it doesn’t soften as easily in hot conditions. A squeegee with a hard rubber blade is a better option only if you regularly work in temperatures of 90°F and above. The hard rubber requires you to apply more pressure against the window.

Silicone: A handful of squeegee blades are made of silicone. Silicone is used in many high-heat applications (like oven mitts), so it isn’t compromised by hot weather. Some silicone formulas are more durable than rubber, while others deteriorate quickly, so check online reviews for user experiences.

Length: The blade should be slightly longer than the channel (the piece that holds the blade) so it can reach into windowpane corners. It can’t be too long, though, or the pressure from the handle and channel won’t direct the flexible material where you need it to go.

Channel

The channel is the portion of the squeegee that holds the rubber blade in place. Channels are usually made of metal. Squeegees with plastic channels may not stand up well to the pressure applied to them and should be avoided.

Size: Channels come in many different lengths. The width of the windows you normally clean should determine the one you choose. The rubber blade must make full contact with the window in order to work effectively, so if you’re cleaning small panes, such as on a French window, you’ll require a squeegee with a channel shorter than the width of the panes. For cleaning wide panes of glass, you want a squeegee with a larger channel. Channels measuring 18 inches are some of the largest options on the market.

Brass: Squeegees originally had brass channels, and brass is still the most popular. It’s the heaviest channel material, a consideration if you have many windows to clean at once. It’s also the most rigid, so it should stand up to pressure and give you an impressive finish time and time again. Brass won’t rust, although it might corrode slowly under some conditions, so it’s best to dry it off after every job. Squeegees with brass channels are usually the most expensive.

Stainless steel: Squeegees with stainless steel channels are a bit lighter than those with brass and not quite as rigid. Stainless steel doesn’t rust, and it’s less expensive than brass.

Aluminum: If the weight of the squeegee is a major concern, you should consider one with an aluminum channel. Aluminum is remarkably light; however, these channels are less rigid than either brass or stainless steel. Still, many professional window cleaners have found quality squeegees that have aluminum channels, and they appreciate the cost savings.

Handle

The squeegee handle should be comfortable to grip and strong enough to take the pressure necessary to scrape water off the glass. Most handles are made of metal and coated with rubber for an effective grip, but some metal handles lack a rubber grip. Plastic handles offer a lightweight alternative for users who need it.

EXPERT TIP

A squeegee that has a channel that’s longer than the blade won’t be able to clean window corners well.


Staff  | BestReviews

Window squeegee features

Adjustable channel: No one wants to pay for two high-end squeegees if they can help it. But if you have both French windows and picture windows, you’ll be doing just that (or cleaning your picture window in tiny strips). A squeegee with an adjustable channel lets you lengthen or shorten the channel to use rubber blades of different lengths on different panes.

Quick-release head: If an adjustable handle doesn’t appeal to you, but you need to change sizes, a quick-release head may be a better choice. This system allows you to easily switch between different lengths of channels and blades to better fit different windows.

Handle

Threaded handle: A six-inch squeegee handle will only get you so high, even if you’re standing on a chair or ladder. Many squeegees are designed with handles that can attach to an extension pole to reach higher panes. Not all designs are interchangeable, so make sure the squeegee you pick has threading for the extension pole you prefer.

Swivel handle: Different windows require different angles. A squeegee with a swivel handle is able to pivot to adjust to different windows. In most cases, you can simply press a button to allow the squeegee head to swivel and then press it again to lock it into place .

Handle grip: Using a window squeegee can require a significant amount of pressure, which can hurt if you have arthritis or other joint pain. Many window squeegees have a foam grip or other type of handle that makes them easier to hold for long periods of time.

Squeegees are also sometimes called “squilgees” or “squimjims.”

Window squeegee prices

Inexpensive: You can find budget window squeegees for roughly $9 to $15. In this price range, they have rubber or silicone blades measuring 8 to 10 inches. These squeegees are made primarily of plastic, but some have aluminum channels. They won’t likely attach to an extension pole. 

Mid-range: Middle-of-the-road window squeegees cost roughly $15 to $20. In this price range, squeegees feature rubber blades measuring roughly 12 to 18 inches. Channels may be made of brass, stainless steel, or aluminum. Most are threaded to attach to an extension pole.

Expensive: The best window squeegees cost $30 or more. If you’re paying this much for one, it should have an adjustable channel so it can be used on panes of different sizes. Squeegees in this price range should be threaded to match a quality extension pole and have value-added features like a swivel or quick-release head to make your job easier and more efficient.

DID YOU KNOW?

The first squeegee-type tools were made of leather and used to clean the decks of ships.

Tips

  • Use a microfiber cloth. If your squeegee leaves any wet spots behind, dry them with a microfiber cloth or towel.
  • Know when it’s time to replace the blade. Replace the rubber or silicone blade in your squeegee when the tool starts leaving fine lines on the glass.
  • Match the right replacement blade to the channel. If you’re replacing the blade, make sure you have the right shape. Some have a rounded edge that slides into the channel; others are shaped like the letter T. The two are not interchangeable.
  • Look for angled channels and blades. That way, the channel won’t scrape the window.

Other products we considered

In case you’re looking for something other than the squeegees in our matrix above, here are a couple more. We’re intrigued by the possibilities in the Unger Professional Microfiber Combi. This unique tool features a microfiber scrubber on one side and a squeegee on the other. The scrubber is useful for both cleaning the window and wetting it for the squeegee. If you’re always losing your squeegee, consider the OXO Good Grips Squeegee. It comes with a suction cup that perfectly holds this low-profile tool until you need it, which is great for use in a shower.

The term “squeegee” likely came from the English word “squeege,” which was used in the late 1700s and meant “to press” or “to squeeze.” Squeegees themselves didn’t show up until the mid-1800s.

FAQ

Q. What’s the best liquid solution for cleaning windows?
A.
Stores sell all sorts of window cleaners, but they can get pricey. Most pros (the guys who deal with huge plate-glass windows and high-rise buildings) say they simply use a bucket of cold water mixed with a few drops of dish soap. Spread the solution onto the window using a sponge, and you should be good to go.

Q. I have a spot a squeegee won’t touch. Now what?
A.
Window-cleaning experts recommend super-fine (0000) steel wool, and nothing more abrasive, for removing particularly stubborn debris. If you use a higher-grade steel wool or abrasive cleaning pads, you risk scratching the window. Gritty dirt and sand can also scratch your window if they’re pulled across it using any tool, squeegees included. That’s why it’s so important to keep your window wet and use plenty of solution when using a squeegee.

Q. How often do I need to replace a rubber squeegee blade?
A.
You can make your blades last for almost a year if you store them carefully when they’re not in use. The rubber blade (or the whole squeegee) should be stored in a dark, dry place that’s not exposed to direct sunlight. Ultraviolet rays are harmful to rubber. High heat can also soften it and cause it to deteriorate. If you live in a hot climate, keeping your squeegee in the garage may not be the best choice.

The team that worked on this review
  • Bronwyn
    Bronwyn
    Editor
  • Kristin
    Kristin
    Writer
  • Melinda
    Melinda
    Web Producer
  • Rich
    Rich
    Writer
  • Steph
    Steph
    Web Producer

BestReviews wants to be better. Please take our 3-minute survey,
and give us feedback about your visit today.

Take Survey