Best Golf Club Grips

Updated October 2019
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.
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We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

21 Models Considered
6 Hours Researched
1 Experts Interviewed
133 Consumers Consulted
Zero products received from manufacturers.

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

Why trust BestReviews?
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.

Buying guide for best golf club grips

Last Updated October 2019

Golfers have a lot of equipment choices to make before they play. The golfer must select a set of clubs, a bag, a glove, golf balls, and shoes that match their game. But one piece of gear that many golfers don’t pay as much attention to as they should is the golf club grip.

These simple items wrap around the golf club to improve your hold on the club. With a poor-quality grip, your golf game may suffer. Worn-out grips can cause your hands to slip during the swing, resulting in a ball strike that’s off center.

Fortunately, it’s relatively easy to change the grips on your clubs. When you have new grips, it will almost feel like you have a new set of clubs — and for a fraction of the price. If you’d like to learn more about golf club grips, keep reading our shopping guide. If you’re ready to buy, take a look at our favorites.

Some players like having an extra-thick grip on the putter. It can help the golfer maintain straight wrists through the putting stroke.

Key considerations

When shopping for a new set of golf club grips, pay attention their size. With the right choice here, you’ll have a better chance of success with your game.

Size

There are five sizes of golf club grip commonly available for purchase. Although you may find some others, most golfers use one of these.

  • Junior: This size golf club grip doesn’t have a specific diameter, but it has the smallest diameter of all the grips. It’s made primarily for children’s golf clubs. Most junior grips are shorter than grips made for adult players.

  • Undersize: An undersize grip is just a little bit smaller than a standard grip. It measures 0.56 or 0.57 inch in diameter.

  • Standard: Quite a few golfers use the standard grip, which measures 0.58 to 0.60 inch in diameter.

  • Midsize: A midsize golf grip measures 0.64 to 0.66 inch in diameter.

  • Oversize: The oversize golf grip is the largest diameter grip you’ll find, typically measuring 0.70 to 0.72 inch in diameter.

  • Finding the right size: Playing with the wrong size of grip could cost you strokes on the course. Finding the right size for your needs isn’t difficult, however. Start by figuring out what size golf glove you wear. Most women, juniors, and men who wear small gloves use undersize or junior grips. People who wear medium or large gloves need a standard grip. Those wearing extra-large gloves will want a midsize or oversize grip.
DID YOU KNOW?

Some golf grips have a squarish rather than rounded shape. This shape helps golfers align their hands properly.

Golf club grip features

Material

A key feature is the material used in the grip. It will play a role in your comfort level when using your clubs. Different materials work better in certain types of weather than others, too.

  • Rubber: Rubber is a common material for golf club grips, especially in lower-priced products. The rubber gives a tacky feel, so a lot of grips have at least a little bit of rubber in them. Rubber is firm and works in all kinds of weather.

  • Synthetic: When you want a softer grip material, synthetic is a common choice. A synthetic grip has more give to it than rubber. However, synthetic doesn’t work as well in rainy weather.

  • Leather: Leather wraps around the club handle for a ribbed or corded texture and a traditional look. It gives golfers a nice mix of stickiness and softness. However, leather lacks durability, is expensive, and doesn’t work well in rain.

  • Hybrid: A hybrid golf club grip typically combines rubber and synthetic or natural fibers woven into the rubber, enhancing the best of both materials. Hybrid grips have moisture-wicking properties, which is helpful for golfers whose hands sweat while playing.

Adjusting the fit

  • Tape: If you want to adjust the size of the grip slightly, you can use multiple layers of tape under the grip. Each layer adds 0.01 to 0.02 inch to the diameter of the grip.

  • Go larger or smaller: If you want to limit movement in the wrist during your swing, use a larger diameter golf club grip. That’s why some golfers use a larger diameter grip on putters and a standard grip on their other clubs. For golfers who have a natural slice in their swing, a smaller diameter grip may help. A larger grip may help some golfers who tend to hook the ball.

  • Test: To find the right size grip for you, visit the pro shop at your local golf course. Try holding a few different sizes of grips. A grip is the right size for you if your fingertips lightly touch your palm when you’re holding the club properly.
EXPERT TIP

If you often play in the rain, look for a golf club grip that has woven fibers that provide moisture-wicking capabilities.


Staff  | BestReviews

Golf club grip prices

Compared to the expense of buying new golf equipment, adding new grips to the clubs isn’t expensive. However, because you should do all of your clubs at the same time, the total bill can add up quickly. Many manufacturers sell golf grips in sets of 9 to 15, encouraging you to regrip all of your clubs at one time.

Inexpensive: The least expensive golf grips cost $4 to $10 each. Most of these basic grips consist of rubber only. You’ll pay roughly $40 to $120 to regrip an entire set of 10 to 12 golf clubs.

Expensive: Pricier golf grips cost $10 to $30 each. Your entire set of golf clubs will cost about $100 to $360 to regrip. You can find synthetic, leather, and hybrid grips in this price range.

Tape: Some people choose to regrip their clubs themselves. Grip tape costs $5 to $10 per roll, although you likely won’t need an entire roll to regrip your clubs. If you decide to pay someone else to do the work, you’ll likely pay $2 to $4 per grip for the work.

The adhesive used to attach the grip to the club shaft is two-sided grip tape. You’ll likely have to purchase this tape separately when buying a set of grips.

Staff
BestReviews

Tips

  • Clean the grips occasionally. Cleaning the grips after every ten uses or so will help them last longer. Use a soft scrub brush, mild dish soap, and warm water. Rinse the soap solution off the grip, and pat the area dry with a towel. Allow the clubs to fully air-dry before using them again.

  • Store your golf clubs indoors. Temperature changes can cause golf club grips to break down prematurely, as can exposure to UV rays. Instead of storing your clubs in a garage or car trunk, keep them in a climate-controlled area away from windows.

  • Handle your clubs carefully. If you don’t have an individual compartment for each club in your bag, use care when inserting the clubs in the bag. Packing the clubs tightly so the grips rub against each other can cause the grips to come loose or get damaged.

Other products we considered

The majority of golfers will be able to find a style of golf club grip to meet their needs in our recommended products above. However, if you’re seeking a grip that’s a little different than the norm, here are some other products we considered. For those who want oversize grips that are soft on the hands, the Winn Excel Oversize Golf Grip Set of 13 is a reasonably priced choice. With these grips, you won’t have to use as much force to keep the club from twisting. For grips with moisture-wicking capabilities, we like the Wedge Guys MM Performance Golf Grip Set. These 13 grips are reasonably priced and work in any kind of weather. One of the thickest, softest grips for a putter is the SuperStroke Fatso 5.0 Putter Grip. It’s pricey, but it will conform nicely to the way you hold your putter. For a novelty putter grip, you can show off your favorite college sports team with the Team Golf NCAA Golf Putter Grip. More than 60 teams are available.

Golf grip manufacturers recommend changing the grips every 40 to 60 rounds played. Those golfers who practice often will need to regrip toward the low end of that range.

FAQ

Q. What is the benefit of purchasing new grips for my golf clubs?
A.
The original grips on your clubs naturally wear down with use. Skin oils, sweat, and UV rays all can cause grips to degrade. As the grip wears down, the club may twist or slip in your hands when you make contact with the ball, which can lead to ball strikes that are off center. The club even may fly out of your hands, causing a dangerous situation.

Q. What types of golf club grips are best for people with arthritis and sore elbows?
A.
Look for a grip material that’s soft and lightweight. Softer grips absorb more of the shock of the club head making contact with the ball and ground. This results in less pain during the swing. A soft grip also allows a player with painful hands and wrists to grip the club more securely.

Q. What types of things will I notice when the grip is beginning to wear down?
A.
The grip will become less sticky as it ages. You can sometimes restore this tacky feel by washing the grip. Other signs that a golf grip is wearing down are cracks in the material and worn spots. Most grips are black, but those that are other colors may fade.

The team that worked on this review
  • Amber
    Amber
    Writer
  • Bronwyn
    Bronwyn
    Editor
  • Devangana
    Devangana
    Web Producer
  • Eliza
    Eliza
    Production Manager
  • Enid
    Enid
    Editor
  • Kyle
    Kyle
    Writer
  • Melinda
    Melinda
    Web Producer

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