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Best Flea Collars for Cats

Updated September 2023
Bottom line
Pros
Cons
Best of the Best
Seresto Flea and Tick Collar for Cats
Seresto
Flea and Tick Collar for Cats
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Customer Favorite
Bottom Line

This popular collar is designed to get rid of fleas quickly and efficiently before they bite your cat.

Pros

Odorless and non-greasy. Effective within 24 hours of the first application. Works through contact. Delivers 8 months of protection from fleas and ticks.

Cons

Pricier than other options.

Best Bang for the Buck
Zodiac Breakaway Flea and Tick Collar for Cats
Fipukin
Natural & Safe Flea and Tick Collar for Cats
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Best for Everyday Use
Bottom Line

This flea collar protects your kitty naturally with a non-toxic combination of essential oils.

Pros

Stop fleas, ticks, and lice from taking up residence in your cat’s fur. Each collar provides 8 months of protection. Trim the collar to fit your cat’s neck and break the collar with a twist in an emergency. Each package contains 2 collars, a flea comb, and a special spoon-shaped tool for removing ticks.

Cons

Some report these collars can irritate the skin around a cat’s neck. Some clever kitties manage to squirm out of this collar.

Parenda Flea and Tick Collar for Cats
Hartz
UltraGuard ProMax Flea And Tick Collar For Cats And Kittens, 2 Pack
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Easiest to Use
Bottom Line

This collar will protect your cat or kitten from fleas and ticks for up to 7 months.

Pros

Soft and flexible, it has a dual buckle system to hold it in position. It has a tapered end that fits easily into the buckle. Breakaway points on the collar allow for quick removal in case of an emergency. The collar kills fleas and ticks and their eggs. Your cat can wear this collar along with his or her regular collar.

Cons

Owners report varying results with this collar. Some sensitive cats don’t like the collar and will struggle to remove it.

Adams Plus Flea & Tick Collar For Cats
Adams Plus
Flea & Tick Collar For Cats
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Trusted Brand
Bottom Line

This product will kill and repel fleas, ticks, flea eggs, and flea larvae effectively for many months.

Pros

Ingredients will continuously spread outward over your cat’s body. Each collar provides 7 months of protection. Designed with a breakaway collar for safety. Size is adjustable. Suitable for cats and kittens 12 weeks or older.

Cons

Some noted the product has odor.

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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and all opinions about the products are our own. About BestReviews  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.About BestReviews 
HOW WE TESTED

We recommend these products based on an intensive research process that's designed to cut through the noise and find the top products in this space. Guided by experts, we spend hours looking into the factors that matter, to bring you these selections.

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141
Consumers
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Buying guide for best flea collars for cats

You love your furry feline, but the fleas and ticks it brings into your home? Not so much. You could try a topical treatment, but you need to remember to reapply it monthly, and it can leave your cat’s coat feeling greasy. Fortunately, there’s another option: flea collars for cats.

Cat flea collars do the same job as their topical counterparts. They keep fleas, ticks, and other unwanted pests away from your cat, but unlike topical products, collars last for several months at a time. But while this is one of the main benefits of choosing a flea collar for cats, it’s also the key reason you need to be cautious when choosing one. The wrong flea collar could end up doing your cat more harm than good.

Here’s a guide to help you choose the best flea collar for your beloved pet.

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If you notice your cat licking or biting itself excessively, this could be a sign that it has fleas.

Types of flea collars for cats

Some flea collars kill both fleas and ticks while others may only kill fleas. In addition, some collars only work on the adult insects, enabling larvae to continue to grow and potentially irritate your cat even more. Think about which types of pests you’re having problems with and choose a flea collar that is designed to eliminate those insects. It’s best to choose a collar that takes care of juvenile fleas as well as adult fleas to stop the infestation in its tracks.

  • Active ingredients

All cat flea collars should clearly list the active ingredients. Some common flea- and tick-killing agents include fipronil, imidacloprid, etofenprox, and flumethrin. A few collars are also made from natural essential oils like citronella. Some users argue that these natural collars are better for pets, while others argue that they don’t work as well. It’s up to you to decide which one you feel is better for your pet. Whichever type you choose, make sure you buy a feline flea collar. Dog flea collars can contain other ingredients that are toxic to cats.

If your cat has sensitive skin, you’ll need to take special care when choosing a flea collar formula to make sure that your cat doesn’t have a reaction to it. But don’t just take the manufacturer’s word for it. “Hypoallergenic” is an unregulated term, and any manufacturer can make the claim without providing any proof to back it up. For a better measure of how hypoallergenic a flea collar is, consult customer reviews to see if any cats have had a reaction to it.

  • Age of cat

Depending on the collar, you might need to wait until your cat is 8 to 12 weeks old before you can put the flea collar on him. Using it before the recommended age could hurt your still-growing kitten. Consult the manufacturer’s instructions to figure out if the collar you’re interested in is suitable for your cat’s age.

  • Size

The majority of flea collars for cats are adjustable so that they can fit just about any size cat. The collar should fit snugly on the cat without choking it. If you have a particularly large or small cat, you might want to check with the manufacturer to determine how large or small you can make the collar.

  • Material

The flea collar should be made of a tough material that doesn’t break or tear easily. Otherwise, your cat could lose it and with it any protection it had against fleas or ticks. You can get some sense of how well a collar holds up by reading through customer reviews for the flea collar you’re interested in.

  • Protection length

Flea collars for cats work for different periods of time. Some may only last three months while others last up to eight months. Consider the lifespan of the collar when considering its cost. If you want to compare two collars with different durations, price each of them out for a year and figure out which one offers the lower annual cost.

  • Water resistance

A flea collar won’t do your cat any favors if the active ingredient dissolves as soon as your cat gets wet. This shouldn’t be an issue with most cat flea collars, but it’s a wise idea to verify this with the manufacturer before giving your cat a bath while wearing the collar or otherwise exposing it to water.

Flea collar prices

Flea collars range in price from about $5 to nearly $50. But when evaluating your options, you can’t just look at the overall price. Some flea collars come in packs of two or three and some last longer than others. If you want an accurate comparison, you need to pay attention to the overall value. You can do this by pricing out each collar for a full year to assess which offers the lowest long-term costs.

It’s worth noting that a higher price tag doesn’t always indicate a higher-quality or longer-lasting product. It’s better to evaluate your cat’s flea collar based on the protection it offers.

Tips

  • Air out the collar if necessary. If the collar you choose has an unpleasant smell, you might want to air it out for a few days to allow this to dissipate before you put the collar on your cat.

  • Fit the collar correctly. Place the collar around your cat’s neck and tighten until it’s snug, then cut off any excess.

  • Monitor your cat for a few days. When using a new flea collar, it’s crucial that you keep an eye on your cat for the first few days to ensure that she isn’t having any adverse reactions to the formula.

  • Note when you put the collar on your cat. That way you’ll know when it needs replacing.

  • Put the collar on in the spring to guard against ticks. If you’re concerned about ticks, you should aim to put the flea collar on your cat by springtime, when the ticks are the worst. Fleas tend to be worse in the summer months.

  • Consult your veterinarian first if your cat is pregnant or nursing. You want to make sure the formula is safe for kittens.
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Common essential oils used in natural flea collars for cats include citronella, lemon, eucalyptus, and cinnamon.

FAQ

Q. How do flea collars work?

A. Flea collars work in one of two ways: they emit a scent that repels insects or they secrete a medication that seeps into your cat’s skin and kills fleas and ticks either on contact or when they bite your cat.

Q. How long does it take a flea collar to work?

A. Most flea collars begin killing fleas and ticks within 24 hours of application. However, this may vary from one collar to the next. Read the manufacturer’s instructions for specific advice on your cat’s flea collar.

Q. Does my cat need to wear a flea collar all year round?

A. That depends on where you live. In the southern United States, it’s possible for your cat to get fleas at any point throughout the year, but in the northern United States, your cat might not need to wear a flea collar in the winter.

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