Facebook Pixel Code
x
BestReview's Logo
Best For Your Buck Product
Best bang for the buck
Air King
Check Price
Best Of The Best Product
Best of the best
Panasonic
Check Price
BestReview's Logo
Bottom Line
Pros
Cons

How We Decided

We purchase every product we review with our own funds—we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

54
Models Considered
49
Hours Spent
1
Experts Interviewed
234
Consumers Consulted

Shopping Guide For Best Ventilation Fans

A high concentration of moisture and condensation can make a room both uncomfortable and unhygienic. Mold and mildew are a direct result of too much moisture in a space. These fungi are unpleasant and unhealthy, and they threaten the integrity of your drywall, insulation, and even your roof beams.

Sometimes, these dangers remain hidden until disaster strikes. Rectification of the problem then becomes a very expensive prospect indeed.

Fortunately, you can install ventilation fans in your attic, bathrooms, and other potential problem areas to prevent such problems. Even when fitted by a professional, a ventilation fan is an affordable home improvement that most, if not all, homeowners should consider.

How do you select the right ventilation fan for your space? You can take advantage of the information gathered by BestReviews!

A ventilation fan with a light can be used to replace the existing light in your bathroom, doing two jobs at once.

We consult with experts, gather feedback from consumers, and test some products in our lab. The results are not just the most comprehensive you'll find, they're also completely independent.

We never accept manufacturer samples because that might lead to bias – and being completely honest and trustworthy is what our business is all about.

The five ventilation fans above are those that came out on top. Each fulfills a specific demand. and we have no hesitation in recommending them.

For details on what we think constitutes a quality ventilation fan – plus some valuable information to help you make your own choice – please read on.

Allen
Expert Consultant

Allen Rathey is a cleaning expert who promotes healthier indoor spaces. He is past-president of the Housekeeping Channel and the Healthy House Institute, and principal of the Healthy Facilities Institute (HFI) culminating more than 30 years of experience in making indoor places cleaner. He has been tapped as an expert by the New York Times, Real Simple, U.S. News & World Report, and other national media.


Allen  |  Indoor Cleaning Expert

Types Of Ventilation Fans

We’ll discuss three common types of ventilation fans below: exhaust fans, attic fans, and window fans.

Types

Exhaust Fans

The most common type of ventilation fan is an exhaust fan. These are generally used to remove excess condensation, moisture, and other vapors from kitchens, bathrooms, workshops, and so on.

Product in Depth

Product in Depth

Panasonic WhisperWall 70 CFM Wall Mounted Fan

Thoughtful Design

A lot of thought has gone into the engineering of the Panasonic FV-11VQ5 WhisperCeiling Ceiling Mounted Fan. The parts that aren't plastic are either painted with corrosion-resistant finish or are galvanized. The fitting kit, while it might appear more complex than some, gives lots of flexibility and allows the fan to be mounted quickly and easily in practically any situation – though space can be a consideration. Tub and shower safety is ensured when using a GFCI circuit. In addition, this fan meets HVI certification and connects to four-inch ducting.

Types

Attic Fans

The attic fan is an often undervalued appliance that can prevent unseen damage and help your house 'breathe.”

Types

Window Fans

A window fan is technically a type of exhaust fan, though it may be reversible, drawing air in as well as expelling it. Some window fans are portable; you fit them to the window opening. Others can be used as a cheap, albeit less-efficient, alternative to an air conditioner.

EXPERT TIP

Ventilation is one of the best ways to control air quality in your living space.


Allen  | Indoor Cleaning Expert

Ventilation Fan Performance

There are two things that define the performance of a ventilation fan: the amount of air it moves and the noise it makes when doing so.

Performance

Air Volume

The volume of air a ventilation fan moves is rated in cubic feet per minute, or CFM. 50 CFM is usually the minimum for a small space like a single-toilet bathroom. 140 or 150 CFM is considered a high level of performance for a ventilation fan.

There are formulas available for accurately calculating how many CFM you should have for a particular room, but here’s a general rule from the Home Ventilating Institute (HVI): one CFM per square foot should work fine for most spaces.

EXPERT TIP

Ventilation isn't just about removing excess moisture. Fans also remove unpleasant odors, fumes from common household chemicals, and airborne pollutants.


Allen  | Indoor Cleaning Expert
Performance

Noise Output

Though sound is generally measured in decibels, the noise a ventilation fan makes is measured in sones. A sone equals 40 phons, and a phon is roughly equivalent to a decibel – sort of.

Confused? The problem is, a direct comparison can't really be made, because the increase isn't linear. Decibels work like a volume control in single steps: 1,2,3,4, etc. Sones go up exponentially: 1,2,4,8,16, etc.

Consider this comparison. One sone is similar to a quiet fridge. You can only really hear it if you're up close and listening. Levels of less than one sone are often classed as "whisper-quiet.” More than two sones would be clearly audible to most people. Feedback tells us most people think four sones is noisy.

Whether noise output matters to you or not will likely depend on where the ventilation fan is fitted. While a particular model might be considered intrusive if fitted in a bathroom adjoining a bedroom, it probably wouldn't be noticed in a family kitchen at breakfast time.

DID YOU KNOW?

It's often difficult to tell if a quiet, low-volume vent is working. A quick and easy way to check is to hold a piece of tissue paper in front of it.

Extra Features

Some manufacturers offer other features to try to tempt you.

Features

Two Speeds

Two-speed ventilation fans render a higher performance, but that often comes at the expense of extra noise. You might be willing to put up with extra fan noise while you're showering but not at other times, for example. A two-speed fan offers you the option of tailoring the fan’s noise output.

Although air volume (CFM) and sound level (sones) should probably have the biggest impact on your buying decision, style follows close behind. However unobtrusive the positioning of your ventilation fan is, you don't want to live with something you think looks ugly.

Staff
BestReviews
Features

Reversibility

Reversible ventilation fans are useful for basements and garages, giving you the option of bringing cool air into a stuffy environment.

Features

Light

Some ventilation fans come with a light – either an ordinary bulb or a nightlight. Additional options allow for just the light to be working, just the fan, or both.

EXPERT TIP

The biggest mistakes people make when buying a ventilation fan are not considering room size and buying a cheap, noisy fan that nobody wants to use.


Allen  | Indoor Cleaning Expert
Features

Heater

Another nice option is an infrared heater. Some ventilation fan heaters have timers so you can warm the room up in advance of your entry.

Features

Automation Features

Humidity sensors and on/off timers offer varying degrees of automation. If you’re looking for high-end sophistication, a ventilation fan with these features could appeal to you. Some fans even have motion sensors that can detect when a person is in the room. The fan will turn on (or turn up from a lower setting) based on motion sensor data.

Product in Depth

Product in Depth

Air King BFQ 140 High Performance Bath Fan

Gets the Job Done

Low-cost ventilation fans like the Air King BFQ 140 are targeted at consumers who need moisture extraction but don't want to pay a great deal for it. As such, it is quite a basic unit. The question here is whether it's efficient and reliable. The majority of owners say "yes" on both accounts. The Air King BFQ is not the quietest ventilation fan, but given that it's not designed to run constantly, most owners find the noise level acceptable.

Size and Fitting

Photos of ventilation fans often make them seem smaller than they actually are. It's important to check the physical dimensions of your chosen model before ordering.

The majority of ventilation fans are ceiling-mounted. Wall-mount options are available for when you don't have access to roof space. (In this situation, you would likely have to vent sideways through an external wall.) Dual-mount options give you a choice of either position.

Fitting is usually straightforward and is done via some type of frame/carrier. These make it easy to mark the position accurately. You fit the carrier mechanism, then fix the fan to it.

Ducting is either four or six inches, though a few fans offer both. When possible, choose the larger option, as it improves air flow.

Electrical connections are relatively simple, but if in doubt, consult a suitably qualified electrician. If you're installing the ventilation fan yourself, always follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully. Caution is needed, because these devices are often fitted in moisture-rich environments – and electricity and water do not mix!

CAUTION

Beware of unusual ducting sizes. Four inches is common, but a few exhaust fans use six inches. Using smaller ducting than the fan is designed for will overwork the fan and reduce effectiveness.

Ventilation Fan Prices

Bargain basement ventilation fans have a reputation for unreliability and are frequently criticized for being too noisy. Why give yourself the grief when a reliable, HVI-certified, entry-level ventilation producing 50 to 90 CFM can be yours for as little as $30 or $40?

In general with ventilation fans, you get what you pay for. But even the higher-end fans remain very affordable. Quiet, powerful models with 80 to 150 CFM tend cost between $100 and $130. To add a heater or a light to that, you’d pay around $30 more.

Even top-of-the-range ventilation fans with motion- and humidity-sensing technology can be found for under $200.

EXPERT TIP

An attic fan doesn't just prevent problems. When you have windows open, it can draw fresh air through the whole house.


Allen  | Indoor Cleaning Expert

Tips

  • If you often need to leave the house before your bathroom is clear – and you don't want to leave your ventilation fan on all day – look for a model with a humidity sensor or a timer.

  • On a warm day, your attic can be substantially hotter than the outside air. Installing an attic vent will let that hot air escape. This minor home improvement can save you money, as your AC won’t have to work so hard.

  • If you work in your garage, a ventilation fan can make the environment safer and more comfortable. Of course, you should never run a motor in an enclosed space. But oils, paints, and other chemicals can also cause noxious fumes that need to be extracted. If you practice a craft or hobby in your garage, a ventilation fan will help improve the environment by preventing stale air and high humidity.

  • HVI certification ensures that a ventilation fan has been independently tested and meets specific industry standards.

  • Rigid ducting allows for more efficient airflow – and thus better ventilation performance – but it isn't always practical. Flexible ducting should be kept as straight as installation allows.

  • Vent fans that include a heater should not be installed over a shower or tub. Other fans should be connected through a ground fault circuit interrupter, or GFCI.

  • The HVI recommends that all enclosed bathrooms have their own exhaust fan.

  • Energy Star-certified fans can be 60% more efficient than standard fans.

Good ventilation can be particularly beneficial to those with respiratory problems, including allergy sufferers.

FAQ

Q. I have a large attic space. Is it OK to vent my bathroom into that?

A. No. However large, your attic is still a closed environment. Venting into it would trap moist air, causing condensation and encouraging mold and rot in your attic. Ventilation fans must always be vented to the outdoors, even if the attic is separately vented.

Q. Instead of running a separate vent, can I tap into an existing one, like the one for my cooker hood?

A. It's not a good idea to use an existing vent, because each one is specifically designed for the appliance that's connected to it. By increasing the air volume, you could actually overload the vent, causing condensation to fall like rain back down the ducting.

Q. In the winter, won't a ventilation fan mean warm air is leaking out the roof, thereby elevating my heating bill?

A. Your ventilation fan should have a baffle that is closed when it's not running. That way, warm air is only extracted when the fan is actually working. Vents are almost always used in situations where you're increasing the amount of warm air, anyway. The vent simply returns heat and humidity to a “normal” level.

If you left the fan running longer than necessary, there could be some heat loss, which in turn could add a few pennies to your heating bill. However, if you don't ventilate properly, you suffer personal discomfort and the harmful effects of condensation – which could cost you a great deal more.

Find the best gifts for the home

These are our top picks for home.

Best Roombas


iRobot

Roomba 980

Check Price

Best Vacuum Cleaners


Dyson

Small Ball Multi Floor Upright Vacuum

Check Price

Best Ring Doorbells


Ring

Video Doorbell Pro

Check Price

Best Scented Candles


Diptyque Baies

Roses with Black Currant Leaves

Check Price

Best Salt Lamps


Levoit

Elora Himalayan Salt Lamp

Check Price

Best Essential Oil Diffusers


ZAQ

LiteMist, Color-Changing

Check Price

Best Touchless Trash Cans


simplehuman

Semi-Round Sensor Can

Check Price

Best Weather Stations


Davis Instruments

Vantage Vue

Check Price

Best Air Purifiers


Honeywell

True HEPA

Check Price

Best Smart Thermostats


Nest

Learning Thermostat 3rd Generation

Check Price

Best Amazon Echo Device


Amazon

Original Echo

Check Price

Best Smart Light Switches


Wemo

Smart Light Switch

Check Price

Best Steam Mops


BISSELL

Powerfresh Steam Mop

Check Price

Best Steam Irons


Rowenta

Focus 1700-Watt Micro Steam Iron

Check Price

Best Dry Mops


Nine Forty

Ultimate Cotton Dust Mop

Check Price

  • Bob
    Bob
    Writer
  • Devangana
    Devangana
    Web Producer
  • Eliza
    Eliza
    Digital Content Strategist
  • Melissa
    Melissa
    Senior Editor
×

Support Us

At BestReviews, we purchase every product we review with our own funds. We never accept anything from product manufacturers. Our goal is to be 100% objective in our analysis, and we do not want to run the risk of being swayed by products provided at no cost.

Help support our research and testing by making a contribution.

$15
$25
$50
$100
$