Best Waist Cinchers

Updated May 2019
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.
We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.
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How we decided

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

84 Models Considered
10 Hours Researched
1 Experts Interviewed
169 Consumers Consulted
Zero products received from manufacturers.

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

Why trust BestReviews?
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.
We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.
We may earn a commission if you purchase a product through our links.

Shopping guide for best waist cinchers

Last Updated May 2019

Achieving a slimmer waistline is no easy feat. If you've ever tried to shed a few pounds through healthy eating and exercise, you probably already know what a lengthy process it can be. If you're looking to shave a few inches off your waist in record time, a waist cincher can help. By compressing the midsection and improving posture, waist cinchers instantly give wearers a slimmer, more streamlined silhouette.

Waist cinchers come in a handful of styles to suit every waist-whittling need, but choosing the right one can be a challenge. Should you opt for a heavy-duty, corset-style cincher or start with something less constricting? What's the difference between steel boning and plastic boning? How do you choose the right size and style for your shape?

At BestReviews, we strive to simplify every shopping experience. If you have questions, our in-depth guide can help you find the answers. Keep reading for everything you've ever wanted to know about waist cinchers. Once you're done, you can use our recommended products to make an informed purchase.

Waist cinchers typically have multiple rows of fasteners. Start on the loosest setting and progressively work your way to a tighter fit over the course of a few weeks.

Key considerations

Types of waist cinchers

Waist cinchers come in a variety of styles. While all can help reduce waist size, each works a little differently. Depending on your individual needs, you may find that a particular style works better for you than another.

Basic: Hands down the most popular style, a basic waist cincher resembles a corset without laces. Starting just beneath the bust and extending down to the hips, a basic waist cincher targets the entire abdominal region. These typically also feature multiple rows of hook-and-eye fasteners (called the busk), allowing you to adjust compression as necessary.

Vest: These waist cinchers are generally quite similar to basic waist cinchers, but with the addition of shoulder straps. Because the shoulder straps make it virtually impossible for the waist cincher to slip down, this style tends to work well for active individuals. If you have a large bust, a vest-style waist cincher can also provide much-needed back support. However, you'll need to take extra care to choose the right bust size.

Workout: Sometimes referred to as belt waist cinchers, these are usually shorter than other styles and offer improved flexibility as well. More often than not, workout waist cinchers have a thermal effect and are designed to trap body heat and increase perspiration during exercise. Most workout waist cinchers close with hook-and-loop fasteners, making them easy to put on, take off, and adjust.

Corset: The original waist cinchers, corsets are incredibly effective at reducing waist circumference. That said, they're also the most restrictive and can be difficult to fasten. If you’re new to waist cinchers, you might want to start with a basic model first. Corsets come in styles that fit under the bust and over the bust. With steel boning throughout, metal busk in the front, and long laces in the back, a corset has a solid feel and can be pulled tighter than other types of waist cinchers for a more dramatic effect.

Size and fit

Waist cinchers come in sizes to fit just about any body type. To find the best fit for your shape, it's vital that you measure yourself before you buy. Using a tape measure, determine the circumference of the following areas:

  • Directly under bust
  • Narrowest part of waist
  • Top of hips
  • Widest part of bust (only for overbust waist cinchers)

Next, measure the length of your torso. For an accurate measurement, take a seat first and be sure to keep your back straight. Start just under your bust and measure the length to the crease created by the top of your thigh. Using these measurements, refer to the manufacturer sizing chart to find the best fit.

Materials

The vast majority of waist cinchers are made of flexible materials like nylon, latex, spandex, or a combination of these. These types of fabrics work especially well for everyday wear by allowing for a fuller range of motion without sacrificing compression. If you're unlucky enough to have a latex allergy, take extra care to identify the materials in each waist cincher before you buy.

Corsets, on the other hand, are often worn as much for their dramatic flair as they are for their waist-whittling abilities and can be found in a host of premium fabrics, including cotton, satin, brocade, and leather.

EXPERT TIP

Wearing a thin tank top under your waist cincher can help reduce general irritation and protect sensitive skin from any potential reaction to latex.


Staff  | BestReviews

Waist cincher features

Boning

Boning refers to the solid vertical rods sewn into a waist cincher or corset. These can be made of either plastic or metal. Boning not only delivers a tighter cinch but also keeps fabrics from rolling and warping. Typically, more boning equals a tighter cinch and a sturdier product overall.

Plastic: Plastic boning tends to be reasonably flexible, allowing for a fuller range of motion. However, keep in mind that plastic boning isn't as strong or durable as steel boning.

Steel: Steel boning can be either flat or coiled. While both are sturdier than plastic, flat steel boning can be extremely rigid and restrictive, while coiled steel molds to your contours and doesn't have any sharp edges.

Fastening system

A tight cinch demands solid fasteners. Although most waist cinchers are outfitted with robust metal clasps, a handful close with hook-and-loop fasteners. More often than not, the latter are found on lightweight waist cinchers or those made specifically for wearing while working out. While hook-and-loop fasteners can hold a decent cinch, there’s always a chance of it loosening through the course of a day or losing its "stick" after a while. If you're interested in a waist cincher with these fasteners, choose one with dual fastening points and be prepared to adjust and readjust the tightness throughout the day.

Colors and detailing

Choosing colors and fine detailing can be fun, but don't forget to give some thought to your everyday wardrobe before you snap up that cherry red beauty you've been eyeing. While you might get a kick out of wearing bold colors, keep in mind that these are more likely to show through thin or light-colored garments. If you still crave a waist cincher with a bit of extra attitude, go for it, but get one in a nude shade as well for days when you feel like wearing light-colored clothing. The same applies to ribbons, frills, and other little details. They're undeniably attractive, but they’re likely to show up under tight-fitting clothes. Decorative corsets worn as part of an outfit are, of course, the exception.

DID YOU KNOW?

A supportive waist cincher not only takes inches off your midsection but also promotes proper posture.

Waist cincher prices

Waist cincher prices can vary wildly depending on the style, construction materials, and durability.

Inexpensive: Budget-friendly waist cinchers priced between $10 and $15 typically provide mild support, making them a decent starting point as long as you don't expect dramatic results or long-lasting durability.

Mid-range: Waist cinchers in the $15 to $25 price bracket can deliver surprisingly strong compression with excellent results, especially at the higher end of this price range. However, these are likely to have plastic boning and might not last as long as pricier varieties.

Expensive: If you’re looking for a heavy-duty waist cincher with steel boning or a quality corset, you can expect to pay anywhere from $30 to $100 and more, depending on the size, style, materials, and detailing.

EXPERT TIP

For steady progress and lasting results, don't overlook the importance of a healthy diet and exercise.


Staff  | BestReviews

Tips

  • Check for a good fit. Odds are you'll know if your waist cincher is too big, but how can you tell if it's too small? A waist cincher is supposed to fit snugly, after all. Telltale signs of a bad fit include extreme difficulty closing your waist cincher, pronounced bulging around the edges, and fabric that rolls up or down.
  • Wear it for brief periods at first. Even a perfectly fitted waist cincher can feel a little uncomfortable at first. Try wearing it for one to two hours a day to start with. A gentle introduction will help you get used to the sensation of wearing a waist cincher while you break it in.
  • Avoid eating heavy meals while wearing the waist cincher. Eating a large meal with you midsection securely cinched can cause discomfort and, because your stomach is compressed, could even lead to reflux. Reduce portion sizes and eat slowly to avoid digestive discomfort.
  • Engage your core. If you're interested in gaining long-term results, try not to let your waist cincher do all the work for you. Being proactive and engaging your core muscles can help you maintain good posture and a trimmer midsection even when you aren't wearing your waist cincher.
  • Stay hydrated. Most waist cinchers have a thermal effect, creating a mini sauna around your midsection. This is wonderful for promoting perspiration and flushing out toxins, but don’t forget to drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration.

Other products we considered

If your torso is short, and you have a tough time finding a decent fit, the SHAPERX Heavy-Duty Short Torso Corset might be just what you're looking for. With premium double steel-boned construction and a specialized cut for short torsos, this corset delivers serious waist cinching with an improved fit. Tried waist training before, but just couldn't stomach wearing an uncomfortable cincher? The hugely popular latex NuvoFit Lady Slim Fajas Colombian Waist Cincher offers a fantastic balance of comfort and compression that works well for most. If you're looking for a waist cincher specifically to wear while working out, the neoprene and polyester construction of VENUZOR Waist Trainer Belt will help you work up a sweat while supporting your back and cinching your waist at the same time.

While many manufacturers encourage users to wear a waist cincher while working out, you should only do so if you’re able to maintain proper form and a natural range of motion.

FAQ

Q. Can a waist cincher help me lose weight?
A.
Absolutely! Wearing a waist cincher is not only a fantastic weight-loss motivator, but it also makes it nearly impossible to overeat, and a reduction in calories naturally leads to some level of weight loss. Additionally, it's very likely that you'll shed some water weight through sweat as well.

Q. How much of a reduction in waist circumference will I see when wearing a waist cincher?
A.
That depends on the compression of the waist cincher and how tightly you're able to fasten it. On average, first-time users of basic waist cinchers see a reduction of around one to three inches. Individuals with significant waist-training experience are often able to shave off anywhere from three to seven inches using heavy-duty steel-boned corsets.

Q. For how many hours a day should I wear my waist cincher?
A.
If you’re just starting out, it's best to begin with a few hours a day until you break in your waist cincher. Once you've become accustomed to the feel of your waist cincher and it's loosened up a bit, you can slowly work your way up to wearing it for eight to ten hours a day or from morning to evening.

The team that worked on this review
  • Bronwyn
    Bronwyn
    Editor
  • Eliza
    Eliza
    Production Manager
  • Erica
    Erica
    Writer
  • Melinda
    Melinda
    Web Producer
  • Melissa
    Melissa
    Senior Editor

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