Best Low-Protein Dog Food

Updated October 2020
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and all opinions about the products are our own. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
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We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

62 Models Considered
24 Hours Researched
2 Experts Interviewed
208 Consumers Consulted
Zero products received from manufacturers.

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.


For some dogs, digesting protein can be difficult on the kidneys and liver. For older dogs, kidney and liver problems can cause the dog’s health to deteriorate quickly. Low-protein dog food helps animals that have kidney, liver, or bladder problems (such as bladder stones). Most dog food has at least a 25% protein content. Low protein food, on the other hand, will have protein levels of 18% or less — usually much less. Dogs need protein to maintain lean muscle mass and energy, so choosing a low-protein diet should only be done with the help of a veterinarian. In fact, low-protein food often needs veterinarian approval to purchase.
 

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