Best Kids' Snow Skis

Updated March 2020
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
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Why trust BestReviews?
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
How we decided

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

38 Models Considered
9 Hours Researched
1 Experts Interviewed
475 Consumers Consulted
Zero products received from manufacturers.

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

Buying guide for best kids’ snow skis

Last Updated March 2020

If you love skiing and want your kids to enjoy it, too, you need to get them some skis. Buying skis is an investment that requires care, especially if you’re buying for a young person who may be somewhat picky about fit and needs something that can be easily put on and taken off.

The length of skis in relation to your child’s size, both height and weight, is one of the most important points to take into consideration. Size also relates to skill level; shorter skis are easier to maneuver and turn, so a beginner would need something shorter than an advanced skier.

We created this buying guide so you can glide through shopping and get right to what matters: skiing. Read this article to learn about ski size, material, price, and all the other factors you need to understand to select the best pair of snow skis for that special young person in your life.

When you’re taking your kids skiing for their first few times, act like a kid yourself. It helps relieve the tension and encourages them to have fun.

Key considerations

Experience and size

The right ski length for a child varies depending on their skill level. As mentioned, shorter skis are easier to maneuver and turn, so you’ll want to start with skis that are approximately chin height if you’re outfitting a beginner.

If your child has already been on the slopes a few times and is confident in their abilities, a longer set of skis is recommended. Start with skis that come up their eyebrows, adding or subtracting a bit of length according to their weight and/or height.

Weight and height

Skis are often measured using the metric system. There is some wiggle room here, but if your child is 135 centimeters tall (4 feet, 5 inches), they need skis that are around 119 centimeters long, which would be just about chin height. If your child is 4 feet, 6 inches tall, they need skis that are 125 centimeters long.

Another way skis can be fitted is based on weight. If your child weighs 40 to 50 pounds, they’ll use skis that are approximately 90 centimeters long. If they weigh 50 to 60 pounds, they’ll use skis that are approximately100 centimeters long.

You can easily find this information by searching online, though it varies somewhat from source to source. Sometimes, the ski manufacturer will provide a chart that helps you determine what’s best.

Cross country vs. downhill

Children’s skis aren’t intended to be used on downhill slopes the way adult skies are. They can be used on the bunny slope or beginner slope, but the bottom of the skis aren’t meant to be waxed for speed. These are more akin to cross country skis than anything else.

EXPERT TIP

Always stop skiing before your children are ready to stop. This leaves them wanting more, and they won’t have the experience of becoming too tired or too cold.


Staff  | BestReviews

Features

Material

Children’s skis are almost always made from plastic. Many times, the inner core is softer and more flexible than the rest of the ski. This makes them soft and forgiving; the skis flex and bend without the child exerting extra effort.

Ease of use

The more flexible skis are, the easier it will be for a child to learn to use them. They usually don’t have metal edges, but they do come with uplifted tips, called rockers, to prevent snow plowing with the skis.

Bindings

The bindings on children’s skis are different than the bindings on adult skis. They are adjustable straps of one variety or another, sometimes touted as “universal” bindings. That means the skis won’t pop off during an accident or fall.

The bindings on kids’ snow skis don’t use Velcro. Rather, they use web straps through a cinch that have three-pronged quick releases, so you can still get the child out of the skis in a hurry if you need to.

Ski poles

For beginners, ski poles can be a hindrance rather than a help. Youngsters who are new to skiing won’t be making any sharp turns where poles would be helpful, and if you’re supervising closely, they may not even need them to stay upright. Until your child is comfortable enough on the slopes to use them in stride, many experts suggest that it’s better to go without poles.

Of course, some kid’s skis come with poles. If your purchase includes poles, you could always confiscate them until the appropriate time.

EXPERT TIP

Never let kids ski alone, even on the bunny slope. Some parents put a harness on their children and ski behind them while holding on with a length of line. This allows the parents to determine the speed and help prevent falls.


Staff  | BestReviews

Accessories

Boys’ snowsuit: Burton Boys Minishred Striker One-Piece Jacket
Keep your little boy warm on the slopes with this one-piece snowsuit from Burton. It is available in nine different colors for ages two to eight. It’s machine washable and adjustable as he grows.

Girls’ snowsuit: Bluemagic Big Kid's One Piece Snowsuits
Available in seven bright colors for the little princess in your family, these one-piece snowsuits from Bluemagic are machine washable and cold-resistant down to -30°F.

Snow gloves: YR.Lover Children Ski Gloves (2-4Y)
These warm, snowproof winter gloves from YR. Lover come in 16 brilliant colors to suit the most discriminating child. Keep their little hands warm while they frolic in the snow.

Goggles: Yidomto Ski Goggles, Pack of 3
These ski goggles from Yidomto have wrap-around UV protection and anti-glare protection to keep your children safe on bright days when the snow glares in their faces. This package of three pairs is highly affordable for a multi-child family.

Ski cap: YING LAN Kids Faux Fur Winter Ski Cap
These lined caps from YING LAN have ear flaps along with a lined face guard that can be pulled around to protect everything below the eyes. Choose from 11 eye-catching colors.

Kids’ snow ski prices

There isn’t a huge variation in price among kid’s skis, but you could spend closer to $40 or closer to $100. The choice is yours. Quality is sometimes, but not always, reflected by price. If you opt for a cheaper pair of skis, durability may suffer somewhat. However, if you’re buying for a child who is still growing, you may not mind if the skis only last a winter or two.

EXPERT TIP

Kids’ skis are excellent learning tools. They are designed to be slow and flexible so children can learn to ski without hurting themselves.


Staff  | BestReviews

Tips

  • Don’t polish or wax your child’s skis. Children’s skis are intended to be slow while they’re learning to ski.
  • If you connect the front end of your children’s skis with a short bungee cord, it will force them to ski with the tips pointed toward each other. This increases their control and stability.
  • Ski poles shouldn’t be used by toddlers and children under four, even though many of them come with the poles. Wait until they’re a little older before adding that complication to the activity.

Other products we considered

We like the Whitewood Snowman Children's Nordic Skis. They're not too expensive and come with poles. These are cross country skis for children from ages two to five. The skis would probably be too short for anyone older than that.

We also like the I-Sport ABS Plastic Kids Beginner Ski Sets. They, too, are for beginners from ages two to five. Ski poles are included, and the universal bindings will fit most children's boots. You have a choice of cartoon penguin decorations or snowflakes. Made from ABS plastic, they don't need waxing.

Don’t force your kids to get on their skis. Instead, demonstrate how much fun you’re having, and pretty soon they’ll be wanting to get on their skis and have fun with you.

FAQ

Q. How long will it take to put the skis on my kids?
A.
If you put their boots and skis on at the house to adjust the straps, then use the three-pronged release catch, it shouldn’t take long at all to put them back on — just a few minutes.

Q. How strong are the included ski poles?
A.
Not very strong at all. They are just plastic poles with a lot of flexibility in them.

Q. How long can my kids use these skis?
A.
Your children will probably outgrow them in a year or so. Two skiing seasons of use is the most you can reasonably expect.

The team that worked on this review
  • Ciera
    Ciera
    Digital Content Producer
  • Melinda
    Melinda
    Web Producer
  • Melissa
    Melissa
    Senior Editor

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