Best House Slippers for Women

Updated November 2020
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and all opinions about the products are our own. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
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Pros
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How we decided

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

56 Models Considered
14 Hours Researched
2 Experts Interviewed
92 Consumers Consulted
Zero products received from manufacturers.

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

Buying guide for Best house slippers for women

When you have some much-deserved downtime at home, comfort is your top concern. One way to get cozy on your day or night off is by sliding your feet into a pair of house slippers.

House slippers are made of soft, warm materials like fleece, faux fur, or flannel. To many wearers, they’re a superior choice to socks. Not only are they much warmer, they’re also much easier to slide on and off. Many styles can even be worn both outdoors and indoors, meaning there’s no need to change footwear when it’s time to take out the garbage or get the mail. And yes, they're perfectly acceptable to wear during early morning carpools. All things considered, house slippers are the most versatile piece of comfortable fashion most women own.

Wondering which house slippers you should be wearing on your next day off? Look no further than this buying guide, which covers everything you need to know before investing in a pair and offers a few of our favorites, too.
 

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House slippers make great gifts for friends and family about to undergo medical or surgical procedures. They’re comfortable and cozy, plus they’re much easier to get on and off than other footwear.

Key considerations

Styles

Scuffs: “Scuff” is a catch-all term for a backless slipper. Given their design, it’s quick and easy to get these house slippers on and off, making them a top choice if you’re looking for convenience.  However, some wearers find the exposed heel to be somewhat drafty and counterproductive when it comes to keeping feet warm.

Moccasins: Traditional moccasins feature a vamp that is stitched to the sides of the slippers. Depending on their design, they may be lined with shearling, flannel, or faux fur. While classic moccasins are made of suede or soft leather, there are several synthetic alternatives that are made with vegan leather (also called leather), microfiber, and microsuede.

Open-toe slippers: These house slippers include two popular styles: slides and thongs. Slides are ideal for women who prefer a relaxed fit where toes can wiggle freely. Some women prefer wearing thong slippers, especially if they want a more secure fit while they walk. While these slippers feature open, airy designs, they’re typically made of plush, even fluffy materials, that keep feet comfortable.

Booties: Bootie-style house slippers are generally cut above the ankle, though some are cut as high as the mid-calf or just below the knee. As these offer the greatest amount of coverage, it comes as no surprise that they’re considered the warmest, coziest option among house slippers.
 

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Did You Know?
Leather and suede house slippers are durable, but they’re prone to staining if you don’t treat them correctly. It’s recommended that you coat them with a water- or stain-repellent spray that’s specifically designed for leather and suede.
Staff
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Features

Materials

Popular materials for house slippers include microfiber, microsuede, fleece, terry cloth, polyester, satin, and faux shearling. Most of these materials are generally lightweight; however, only some terry cloth, satin, and polyester styles are breathable. Unfortunately, this means your feet will be prone to sweating after wearing the others for a while.

Some premium house slippers are made with leather, suede, and/or shearling. These tend to last much longer than synthetic house slippers, though some consumers have reservations about using materials sourced from animals. For that reason, some footwear manufacturers have shared consumer-accessible transparency information on their websites, including ethical sourcing and manufacturing protocols.

Comfort

House slippers are designed to be comfortable, but how? It comes down to unique, well-designed construction and details.

To eliminate irritation, particularly in high-friction areas like the heel and toe box, house slippers have seamless or hidden-seam designs. This feature is most appreciated by people with sensitive skin.

For added shock absorption, some house slippers have a cushioned insole made of memory foam or gel. Other house slippers have a contoured footbed that provides support and places the foot in a neutral position. There are even house slippers designed with pockets to hold microwavable heating packs to keep toes as toasty as possible.

Indoor and outdoor

If you’re wondering whether there’s a difference between indoor and outdoor house slippers, there is. It’s actually quite easy to tell them apart based on the soles.

Indoor-only slippers generally have a soft sole without treads or rubber outsole. They do, however, often have nonslip details for better traction on hardwood, laminate, and tile floors.

Outdoor slippers have a rubber outsole and treads that resemble those seen on casual or some athletic shoes.

Size

Sizing can be all over the place when it comes to house slippers, especially because manufacturers use two sizing methods.

Small, medium, large sizes: This type of sizing, which also includes extra small and extra large, divides the sizes into brackets. Small house slippers, for example, normally fit shoe sizes 5 and 6.

Shoe sizes: Some house slippers follow the sizes for shoes, but they’re only available in whole sizes. For the most part, you’ll need to size up or down if you wear a half size in shoes.

Care

House slippers come with recommended care instructions on their tags. Most synthetic slippers should be spot cleaned because they’re not designed to go into washing machines and dryers, though there are a few exceptions.

Leather and suede slippers require considerable upkeep and mindful cleaning. Leather slippers should be moisturized with leather conditioner on a regular basis and spot cleaned only with products designed for use on leather. Suede slippers require different shoe-care products, which typically include a suede brush and suede-safe spot cleaner.
 

Sprinkle a little bit of baking soda or baby powder inside house slippers to keep odors at bay.

Staff
BestReviews

House slippers for women prices


House slippers for women range in price from $12 to $100. The better the quality, the higher the price.

Inexpensive: Basic house slippers made with synthetic materials cost $25 and less. Quality is hit or miss with these, so to snag a decent pair you’ll need to aim for the top of this price range.

Mid-range: Well-made synthetic slippers cost between $30 and $50, and many of these are made by reputable footwear and loungewear brands. Construction is superior to cheaper options, not to mention the material quality is significantly better.

Expensive: Premium house slippers for women, typically made of suede or leather, cost between $55 and $100. Not only will these styles outlast synthetic house slippers, most of them have well-made outsoles. For that reason, they’re often worn outdoors, too.
 

Caution 2
Caution
House slippers are cozy to wear around the house but think twice about wearing them in the kitchen when you’re cooking. There’s a good chance that a food or beverage spill will stain your favorite slippers.
Staff
BestReviews

Tips

 

  • Buy seasonal slippers. If you live in an area that experiences temperature extremes, it’s a good idea to buy two pairs of house slippers: one for cooler weather and one for warmer weather.
  • Keep slippers away from pets. Pets are often attracted to their humans’ scents, which is why they either chew or abscond with slippers. It’s a good idea to keep slippers off the floor or inside a closet when you’re not wearing them.
  • Avoid alcohol-based cleaners. If possible, avoid cleaning house slippers with alcohol-based cleaners because they’re known to dry out and discolor materials and textiles.
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It’s a good idea to invest in indoor/outdoor house slippers if you’re potty training a puppy. While little Fido is still learning how to go outdoors, house slippers make it quick and easy to head outside when it’s time to go even if you’re in a rush.

FAQ

Q. What happens if I spill water on my house slippers?

A. The best thing to do in this situation is allow the slippers to dry fully before wearing them again. To speed up the drying process, pat them down with towels to absorb some of the water. Next, place them in a cool, dry area overnight. While tempting, it’s not recommended that you place them near a space heater or use a blow dryer because the high heat will damage the slippers.

Q. What’s the verdict: socks with house slippers or no?

A. This is a hotly debated subject in the loungewear realm. Some wearers think that slippers take the place of socks, while others say it’s better to go barefoot inside slippers. One of the pitfalls of going barefoot in them, though, is that any dirt or sweat on your feet will transfer to the inside of the slippers. Since house slippers generally aren’t designed to be deep cleaned, you could end up with an accumulation of grime inside them.

Q. Can I wear house slippers for travel?

A. It depends on the type of travel. House slippers are a solid choice for car and RV trips, though they’re not great for air travel. Not only are they too delicate and flimsy for the amount of walking you’ll do in the airports alone, but they don’t offer much in the way of foot protection. And some airlines won’t allow you on the flight if you don’t have suitable footwear.
 

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