Best Cut-Resistant Gloves

Updated December 2019
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BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
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Why trust BestReviews?
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Read more  
BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing, and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. We buy all products with our own funds, and we never accept free products from manufacturers.Read more 
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We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

17 Models Considered
6 Hours Researched
1 Experts Interviewed
202 Consumers Consulted
Zero products received from manufacturers.

We purchase every product we review with our own funds — we never accept anything from product manufacturers.

Buying guide for best cut-resistant gloves

Last Updated December 2019

Working with knives, power tools, and other sharp objects brings a danger of injury, but cut-resistant gloves can help protect your hands. While no gloves can completely prevent you from getting cut — they're cut-resistant, not cut-proof, after all — you have far more chance of remaining free of injury with a pair of cut-resistant gloves. They're ideal for chefs, contractors, and anyone else who regularly uses tools or handles sharp objects, whether at work or when engaging in a hobby.

You'll need to consider a range of factors when choosing your cut-resistant gloves. The most important factor is the cut-resistance level, which is set out by one of two agencies. However, that's not all you need to consider. You should also think about the materials used to make the gloves and any other features you require, such as heat resistance or non-conducting properties.

Read this guide to cut-resistant gloves to find out more, including some information about our favorite cut-resistant gloves.

Some cut-resistant gloves are available in a range of sizes; be sure to choose the correct size for you.

Key considerations

Level of cut resistance

Manufacturers must test the level of cut resistance before putting cut-resistant gloves on the market. They usually test their gloves according to one of two major standards: American National Standards Institute (ANSI), which is used in North and Central America, and the EN388 standard, which is used in Europe.

  • ANSI: The current ANSI standard uses ratings from A1 to A9 to show the level of cut resistance, with A1 being the least resistant and A9 being the most. A1 gloves can withstand just 200 to 499 grams of pressure, whereas A9 gloves can withstand up to 6,000 grams of pressure.

  • EN388: The current EN388 standard rates cut-proof gloves from A to F. A is the least resistant, and F the most resistant. Cut-resistant gloves with an A rating can withstand just over 200 grams of force. Those with an F rating can withstand just over 3,000 grams of force — a lot more.

Glove material

Cut-resistant gloves can be made from a wide range of materials. Often, they are made from a blend of different materials that make them strong enough to prevent cuts but flexible enough to give the wearer some dexterity. Cut-resistant gloves are often made from a combination of some of the following materials.

  • Kevlar: This synthetic fiber is five times stronger than steel when compared by weight. Not only is it cut-resistant, it's also heat-resistant, so it's great for use in the kitchen.

  • Metal mesh: This is the only cut-resistant glove material that's also puncture resistant. While metal mesh is effective, it's not particularly flexible, so it’s usually combined with more pliable fibers.

  • High performance polyethylene (HPPE): A whopping 15 times stronger than steel, this is an excellent cut-resistant material that can be integrated into the fibers of the glove or used as a coating.

  • Dyneema: This is an incredibly strong fiber spun from HPPE, which is extremely durable and flexible in addition to being resistant to a large number of chemicals.

Glove coating

Some cut-resistant gloves — especially those designed for use by contractors and people in similar positions — feature a coating on the palm and over the fingers. The purpose of the coating is to add grip, puncture resistance, and water resistance. Common coating materials include polyurethane, natural latex rubber, PVC, and nitrile. All of these coatings give fairly similar results, though nitrile is a solid choice if your gloves are likely to be exposed to oil, and PVC is better suited to light-duty use.

Cut-resistant gloves should be a last resort in situations where some cutting risk is inherent. If people are regularly getting cut in a workplace, assess health and safety protocols and give more training, if needed.

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Features

Heat resistance

Some cut-resistant gloves are also heat-resistant, which is great for grilling and kitchen use as well as heavy-duty activities like welding. If you choose a heat-resistant option, check the item description or the packaging, as it should tell you the maximum temperature the gloves can withstand. Some models can withstand close to 1,000°F.

Non-conductive materials

If you'll be working with electricity, we highly recommend selecting cut-resistant gloves made of non-conductive materials. Since some options contain metal fibers or metal mesh, they're highly conductive and could lead to serious injury — even from a fairly minor electric shock.

Comfort

It's important to consider the overall comfort of your chosen cut-resistant gloves, particularly if you'll be using them most days. If they're too uncomfortable to wear for long periods, they won't be much use for a full day's work.

Food-safe materials

If you're buying cut-resistant gloves to use while chopping food, using a mandoline, or any other kitchen tasks, make sure you choose gloves made from food-safe materials.

Cut-resistant glove prices

Cut-resistant gloves aren't very expensive. You can find some basic options for as little as $5 to $10, but you shouldn't expect these to offer a huge degree of protection. Mid-range cut-resistant gloves cost roughly $10 to $20, you can find some great options for general use in this price range. However, they’re not for extremely heavy-duty tasks. Cut-resistant gloves that offer the most protect and also cost the most; expect to pay between $20 and $50 for a pair of high-end cut-resistant gloves.

DID YOU KNOW?

Some manufacturers sell single cut-resistant gloves rather than pairs. If using your cut-resistant gloves for chopping food, you won't need to wear a glove on the hand that holds the knife.

DID YOU KNOW?

Silicone-free cut-resistant gloves help avoid contamination when wearing your gloves for painting.

Tips

  • Don't simply choose the highest cut resistance level — it isn't the right choice for everyone. You don't need an ANSI A9 cut-resistant glove for chopping vegetables, for example. The most cut-resistant options put protection over flexibility and really aren't suited to tasks that require dexterity.

  • Find out how many gloves are in each pack. Don't assume you'll receive a pair of cut-resistant gloves; some are sold as single gloves. You'll also find larger packs featuring multiple pairs.

  • Think about how often you'll need to use your cut-resistant gloves. Are you using them for a one-off task, or do you need them daily for your job?

  • Find out whether you get the same cut resistance all over the glove. Some cut-resistant gloves have coated palms, giving you more cut resistance in that area than on the top of the glove.

Other products we considered

There are a few more options on the market worth your attention. Glove Station Ultra-Durable Series Cut-Resistant Gloves are food-safe options that we recommend mostly for kitchen purposes, though they would also work for lighter construction tasks, such as wood carving and carpentry. They're available in six colors and four sizes.

TruChef Cut-Resistant Gloves come as a pack of three (that's three individual gloves, not three pairs) and are color-coded to avoid cross-contamination for kitchen use. They're machine washable for easy cleaning.

Made from Kevlar, BlueFire Pro Heat Resistant Gloves are both cut-resistant and heat-resistant. They can withstand temperatures of up to 932°F, making them ideal for grilling, using wood-fired ovens, and even welding. With a slightly longer length than other alternatives, they offer some forearm protection, too.

With their polyurethane coating, Pakel High Performance Cut Resistant Gloves give you plenty of grip and extra protection while maintaining flexibility. They're suited to construction use rather than kitchen use, as they aren't made of food-safe materials.

Although nobody wears cut-resistant gloves for fashion, you can find them in a range of colors.

FAQ

Q. Who can benefit from cut-resistant gloves?

A. People with many different professions and hobbies can benefit from cut-resistant gloves. For home use, cut-resistant gloves are often used in the kitchen when chopping food, especially when people are attempting to develop their knife skills. Any hobbyist who does wood carving or carpentry at home might also benefit from cut-resistant gloves. Out in the world of work, these gloves are used by folks in a range of professions, including forestry, construction, mining, aeronautics, recycling, agriculture, and electronics.

Q. How do I clean my cut-resistant gloves?

A. Depending on what you intend to use them for, keeping your cut-resistant gloves clean may or may not be high on your list of priorities. For instance, if you work in a recycling plant handling garbage all day, it doesn't really matter if you have dirty gloves. On the other hand, anyone using cut-resistant gloves for kitchen prep will need to be extremely conscientious about keeping their gloves clean in order to avoid cross-contamination. In this case, it's important to choose gloves that are easy to clean — ideally machine washable.

Q. Can I still get cut when wearing cut-resistant gloves?

A. Yes. Cut-resistant gloves can protect against cuts and slices, but they don’t protect against heavy chopping … and certainly not against moving blades, such as those on band saws and circular saws. As such, you should still proceed with caution when using cut-resistant gloves.

The team that worked on this review
  • Alvina
    Alvina
    Photographer
  • Amos
    Amos
    Director of Photography
  • Branson
    Branson
    Videographer
  • Ciera
    Ciera
    Digital Content Producer
  • Kristin
    Kristin
    Writer
  • Lauren
    Lauren
    Writer
  • Melinda
    Melinda
    Web Producer
  • Melissa
    Melissa
    Senior Editor
  • Vukan
    Vukan
    Post Production Editor

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